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Article: Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) alter larval settlement of marine benthic polychaetes
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TitlePolybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) alter larval settlement of marine benthic polychaetes
 
AuthorsLam, C2
Neumann, R2
Shin, PKS2
Au, DWT2
Qian, PY3
Wu, RSS2 1
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/est
 
CitationEnvironmental Science And Technology, 2010, v. 44 n. 18, p. 7130-7137 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es1012615
 
AbstractPolybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) are found ubiquitously in marine environments worldwide. Sediment is the major sink of PBDEs, with the congener BDE 47 being most abundant. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out to test the hypothesis that contamination of BDE 47 at environmentally realistic sediment concentrations can alter polychaete larval settlement. Using multiple-choice experiment, settlement of three polychaete species (Pseudopolydora vexillosa, Polydora cornuta, and Capitella sp. I) on four types of spiked sediment was studied and compared: (i) low BDE 47 concentration (0.5 ng g -1 dry weight); (ii) high BDE 47 concentration (3.0 ng g -1 dry weight), (iii) hexane (solvent control), and (iv) natural sediment (control). Our results showed that settlement of P. vexillosa and Capitella sp. I larvae was significantly promoted, while settlement of P. cornuta reduced, at high BDE 47 concentration in sediment compared with the respective controls under both short- (24 h) and long-term (4 week) exposures. After 4 weeks, body burden of BDE 47 in all polychaete species was directly related to the spike concentration, and body length of settled juveniles of P. vexillosa and Capitella sp. I at the high-concentration treatment was significantly longer compared with that of other treatments and controls. For the first time, we demonstrated that environmentally realistic concentrations of BDE 47 in sediment can affect polychaete settlement in species-specific and dose-dependent manners. Given the global contamination of PBDE in marine sediment, BDE 47 may potentially alter the settlement pattern of marine polychaetes and hence their benthic composition over large areas. © 2010 American Chemical Society.
 
ISSN0013-936X
2013 Impact Factor: 5.481
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es1012615
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000281629800037
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaAoE/P-04/04
Funding Information:

The work described in this paper was fully supported by a grant from the University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (AoE/P-04/04). Special thanks to A. Chan and E. Lei for technical support for GC-MS analysis and W. Tse for helping with the multiple-choice settlement assays.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, C
 
dc.contributor.authorNeumann, R
 
dc.contributor.authorShin, PKS
 
dc.contributor.authorAu, DWT
 
dc.contributor.authorQian, PY
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSS
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:20:50Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:20:50Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractPolybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) are found ubiquitously in marine environments worldwide. Sediment is the major sink of PBDEs, with the congener BDE 47 being most abundant. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out to test the hypothesis that contamination of BDE 47 at environmentally realistic sediment concentrations can alter polychaete larval settlement. Using multiple-choice experiment, settlement of three polychaete species (Pseudopolydora vexillosa, Polydora cornuta, and Capitella sp. I) on four types of spiked sediment was studied and compared: (i) low BDE 47 concentration (0.5 ng g -1 dry weight); (ii) high BDE 47 concentration (3.0 ng g -1 dry weight), (iii) hexane (solvent control), and (iv) natural sediment (control). Our results showed that settlement of P. vexillosa and Capitella sp. I larvae was significantly promoted, while settlement of P. cornuta reduced, at high BDE 47 concentration in sediment compared with the respective controls under both short- (24 h) and long-term (4 week) exposures. After 4 weeks, body burden of BDE 47 in all polychaete species was directly related to the spike concentration, and body length of settled juveniles of P. vexillosa and Capitella sp. I at the high-concentration treatment was significantly longer compared with that of other treatments and controls. For the first time, we demonstrated that environmentally realistic concentrations of BDE 47 in sediment can affect polychaete settlement in species-specific and dose-dependent manners. Given the global contamination of PBDE in marine sediment, BDE 47 may potentially alter the settlement pattern of marine polychaetes and hence their benthic composition over large areas. © 2010 American Chemical Society.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Science And Technology, 2010, v. 44 n. 18, p. 7130-7137 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es1012615
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es1012615
 
dc.identifier.epage7137
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192058
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281629800037
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaAoE/P-04/04
Funding Information:

The work described in this paper was fully supported by a grant from the University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (AoE/P-04/04). Special thanks to A. Chan and E. Lei for technical support for GC-MS analysis and W. Tse for helping with the multiple-choice settlement assays.

 
dc.identifier.issn0013-936X
2013 Impact Factor: 5.481
 
dc.identifier.issue18
 
dc.identifier.pmid20726517
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77956538459
 
dc.identifier.spage7130
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140879
 
dc.identifier.volume44
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/est
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Science and Technology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoring
 
dc.subject.meshGeologic Sediments - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshHalogenated Diphenyl Ethers - toxicity
 
dc.subject.meshPolychaeta - anatomy and histology - drug effects - growth and development
 
dc.subject.meshSeawater - parasitology
 
dc.titlePolybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) alter larval settlement of marine benthic polychaetes
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Wu, RSS</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. City University of Hong Kong
  3. Hong Kong University of Science and Technology