File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Eliminating depletion effects

TitleEliminating depletion effects
Other TitlesRegulating the depletion effect
Authors
KeywordsBusiness and economics
Marketing and purchasing consumer education and protection
Issue Date2005
PublisherAssociation for Consumer Research.
Citation
Meeting of the Association for Consumer Research (ACR 2005), San Antonio, TX., 28 September-2 October 2005. In Advances in Consumer Research, 2005, v. 33, p. 244-245 How to Cite?
AbstractA depletion effect is a repeated finding in self-regulation research. Respondents who perform an effortful self-regulatory task exhibit less self-control on a subsequent unrelated persistence task than those performing a less arduous self-regulatory task. We report three studies that replicate this effect and extend it by showing that the depletion effect is eliminated when respondents are cognizant of the resources they have allocated to the persistence task, have a high degree of self-awareness, and have limited opportunity to get feedback about their resource allocation. We interpret these results in terms of a monitoring process (Carver and Scheier 1998).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140766
ISSN
2005 Impact Factor: 0.031
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.153

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWan, EWen_US
dc.contributor.authorSternthal, Ben_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:18:47Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:18:47Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationMeeting of the Association for Consumer Research (ACR 2005), San Antonio, TX., 28 September-2 October 2005. In Advances in Consumer Research, 2005, v. 33, p. 244-245en_US
dc.identifier.issn0098-9258en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140766-
dc.description.abstractA depletion effect is a repeated finding in self-regulation research. Respondents who perform an effortful self-regulatory task exhibit less self-control on a subsequent unrelated persistence task than those performing a less arduous self-regulatory task. We report three studies that replicate this effect and extend it by showing that the depletion effect is eliminated when respondents are cognizant of the resources they have allocated to the persistence task, have a high degree of self-awareness, and have limited opportunity to get feedback about their resource allocation. We interpret these results in terms of a monitoring process (Carver and Scheier 1998).en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Consumer Research.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Consumer Researchen_US
dc.subjectBusiness and economics-
dc.subjectMarketing and purchasing consumer education and protection-
dc.titleEliminating depletion effectsen_US
dc.title.alternativeRegulating the depletion effect-
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailWan, EW: ewan@business.hku.hk, ewwan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWan, EW=rp01105en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros192730en_US
dc.identifier.volume33en_US
dc.identifier.spage244en_US
dc.identifier.epage245en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.description.otherMeeting of the Association for Consumer Research (ACR 2005), San Antonio, TX., 28 September-2 October 2005. In Advances in Consumer Research, 2005, v. 33, p. 244-245-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats