File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Six- to 12-month-old infants use emotional response, agent identity, and motion cues in associated learning of social events

TitleSix- to 12-month-old infants use emotional response, agent identity, and motion cues in associated learning of social events
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
Issue Date2011
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2011), Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 423 How to Cite?
AbstractStudies have demonstrated that infants as young as 3 months old can distinguish between events containing prosocial and anti-social implications in theater play (Hamlin et al., 2007, 2010). However, the way infants are able to do so is still not fully understood. Here we study the roles of emotional responses, agent identity, and motion in animated social interactions among 6-to-12-month-old infants. Our Experiment 1 tested whether emotional response enhances infants' differentiation between characters in standardized prosocial and antisocial events. At the habituation stage, twenty-seven 6-to-12-month-old infants watched events depicting a climber being helped or hindered to climb up a hill by another character. These events evoked the climber's associated emotional expressions (laughing after being helped or crying after being hindered). In the test stage, the infants viewed two test events with new contexts – the laughing (or crying) climber approached the character who had previously either helped him climb up (consistent with the habituation), or hindered him (inconsistent with habituation). Infants looked significantly longer at the consistent condition, demonstrating that they associated differential emotional responses to the social events, and could apply this knowledge to new contexts. Experiment 2 was conducted to determine what association was learned. Infants might have used the character (who) or the action (what) or the combination of both (who did what) to distinguish events in Experiment 1. We habituated twenty-eight 10-to-12-month-old infants with the same helping/hindering events. Afterwards, novel events defined by: (1) a new character, or (2) a new motion direction, or (3) a new character with a new motion are presented in the test stage. The looking time significantly recovered from the last habituation trial in all three conditions. Our results suggest that emotional responses enhance infants' associated learning in social context, and both agent identity and motion direction are acquired during learning.
DescriptionPoster Session - Development: Childhood and infancy: no. 33.322
Open Access Journal
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140688
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChow, DHMen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsui, GHTen_US
dc.contributor.authorTseng, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:17:35Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:17:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2011), Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 423en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140688-
dc.descriptionPoster Session - Development: Childhood and infancy: no. 33.322-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.description.abstractStudies have demonstrated that infants as young as 3 months old can distinguish between events containing prosocial and anti-social implications in theater play (Hamlin et al., 2007, 2010). However, the way infants are able to do so is still not fully understood. Here we study the roles of emotional responses, agent identity, and motion in animated social interactions among 6-to-12-month-old infants. Our Experiment 1 tested whether emotional response enhances infants' differentiation between characters in standardized prosocial and antisocial events. At the habituation stage, twenty-seven 6-to-12-month-old infants watched events depicting a climber being helped or hindered to climb up a hill by another character. These events evoked the climber's associated emotional expressions (laughing after being helped or crying after being hindered). In the test stage, the infants viewed two test events with new contexts – the laughing (or crying) climber approached the character who had previously either helped him climb up (consistent with the habituation), or hindered him (inconsistent with habituation). Infants looked significantly longer at the consistent condition, demonstrating that they associated differential emotional responses to the social events, and could apply this knowledge to new contexts. Experiment 2 was conducted to determine what association was learned. Infants might have used the character (who) or the action (what) or the combination of both (who did what) to distinguish events in Experiment 1. We habituated twenty-eight 10-to-12-month-old infants with the same helping/hindering events. Afterwards, novel events defined by: (1) a new character, or (2) a new motion direction, or (3) a new character with a new motion are presented in the test stage. The looking time significantly recovered from the last habituation trial in all three conditions. Our results suggest that emotional responses enhance infants' associated learning in social context, and both agent identity and motion direction are acquired during learning.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry-
dc.titleSix- to 12-month-old infants use emotional response, agent identity, and motion cues in associated learning of social eventsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChow, DHM: chmdoris@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailTsui, GHT: geroldene.ht@gmail.com-
dc.identifier.emailTseng, C: tseng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTseng, C=rp00640en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/11.11.423-
dc.identifier.hkuros195101en_US
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.description.otherThe 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2011), Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 423-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats