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Article: A psychometric evaluation of a negative mood scale in the MDS-HC using a large sample of community-dwelling Hong Kong Chinese older adults
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TitleA psychometric evaluation of a negative mood scale in the MDS-HC using a large sample of community-dwelling Hong Kong Chinese older adults
 
AuthorsLeung, DYP3
Leung, AYM1
Chi, I2
 
KeywordsChinese community dwellers
Confirmatory factor analysis
Elderly
Minimum Data Set-Home Care
Negative mood
Reliability
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/
 
CitationAge and Ageing, 2012, v. 41 n. 3, p. 317-322 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afr157
 
AbstractBackground: negative mood is an important construct when assessing the health of older persons. The profile of mood states questionnaire is commonly used to measure mood; however, it might not be suitable for older adults with low education level and those who are not originated North American.Objective: to examine a negative mood scale formed by nine items in the Mood Section of the Minimum Data Set-Home Care of the Resident Assessment Instrument. Methods: a secondary analysis of data from 3,523 older persons aged 60 or over who had first applied for the long-term care services in Hong Kong and completed the screening tool in 2006. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to test the factor structure and multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis to test the gender invariance of the Negative Mood Scale in the Minimum Data Set-Home Care. Its reliability using Cronbach's alpha was examined. Results: both a three-factor model at the first level and a one-factor model at the second level provided excellent fits to the overall data, and held equally well for both males and females, and two randomly split samples. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses revealed both genders demonstrating an equivalent pattern of factor loadings. Cronbach's alpha value was acceptable for the overall data (0.66). Conclusions: the Negative Mood Scale is a reliable and valid scale and both genders responded to it using the same framework and metric, suggesting it could be used to measure negative mood in Chinese community-dwelling older adults. Further testing of the instrument is needed. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0002-0729
2012 Impact Factor: 3.816
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.333
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afr157
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000303335000007
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLeung, DYP
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, AYM
 
dc.contributor.authorChi, I
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:12:13Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:12:13Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: negative mood is an important construct when assessing the health of older persons. The profile of mood states questionnaire is commonly used to measure mood; however, it might not be suitable for older adults with low education level and those who are not originated North American.Objective: to examine a negative mood scale formed by nine items in the Mood Section of the Minimum Data Set-Home Care of the Resident Assessment Instrument. Methods: a secondary analysis of data from 3,523 older persons aged 60 or over who had first applied for the long-term care services in Hong Kong and completed the screening tool in 2006. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to test the factor structure and multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis to test the gender invariance of the Negative Mood Scale in the Minimum Data Set-Home Care. Its reliability using Cronbach's alpha was examined. Results: both a three-factor model at the first level and a one-factor model at the second level provided excellent fits to the overall data, and held equally well for both males and females, and two randomly split samples. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses revealed both genders demonstrating an equivalent pattern of factor loadings. Cronbach's alpha value was acceptable for the overall data (0.66). Conclusions: the Negative Mood Scale is a reliable and valid scale and both genders responded to it using the same framework and metric, suggesting it could be used to measure negative mood in Chinese community-dwelling older adults. Further testing of the instrument is needed. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturepostprint
 
dc.identifier.citationAge and Ageing, 2012, v. 41 n. 3, p. 317-322 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afr157
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afr157
 
dc.identifier.epage322
 
dc.identifier.hkuros194249
 
dc.identifier.hkuros198909
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303335000007
 
dc.identifier.issn0002-0729
2012 Impact Factor: 3.816
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.333
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid22126988
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860527294
 
dc.identifier.spage317
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140465
 
dc.identifier.volume41
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofAge and Ageing
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Age and Ageing following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Age and Ageing, 2012, v. 41 n. 3, p. 317-322 is available online at: http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/content/41/3/317
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subjectChinese community dwellers
 
dc.subjectConfirmatory factor analysis
 
dc.subjectElderly
 
dc.subjectMinimum Data Set-Home Care
 
dc.subjectNegative mood
 
dc.subjectReliability
 
dc.titleA psychometric evaluation of a negative mood scale in the MDS-HC using a large sample of community-dwelling Hong Kong Chinese older adults
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. University of Southern California
  3. Chinese University of Hong Kong