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Article: The effectiveness of therapeutic play, using virtual reality computer games, in promoting the psychological well-being of children hospitalised with cancer

TitleThe effectiveness of therapeutic play, using virtual reality computer games, in promoting the psychological well-being of children hospitalised with cancer
Authors
KeywordsCancer
Children
Nurses
Nursing
Psychological
Therapeutic play
Virtual reality
Issue Date2011
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Nursing, 2011, v. 20 n. 15-16, p. 2135-2143 How to Cite?
AbstractAims. To examine the effectiveness of therapeutic play, using virtual reality computer games, in minimising anxiety and reducing depressive symptoms in Hong Kong Chinese children hospitalised with cancer. Background. There has been an increase in the use of therapeutic play intervention to help children cope with the stress of hospitalisation. However, it is not clear whether therapeutic play is an appropriate psychological intervention for Chinese children hospitalised with cancer. Design. A non-equivalent control group pretest-post-test, between-subject design was employed. Method. Hong Kong Chinese Children (8-16years of age), admitted to a paediatric oncology ward for the treatment of cancer during a 14-month period, were invited to participate in the study. Of the 122 children, 70 formed the control group receiving routine nursing care and 52 in the experimental group receiving therapeutic play interventions. Results. The results showed that children in the experimental group reported statistically significant fewer depressive symptoms than children in the control group on day 7. The results, however, find no differences in children's anxiety scores between the two groups on day 7. Conclusion. The study provides empirical evidence to support the effectiveness of therapeutic play, using virtual reality computer games, in the psychological preparation of children hospitalised with cancer, thus charting a path towards promoting holistic and quality care. Relevance to clinical practice. The findings heighten the awareness in healthcare professionals that play is a very important part of children's life and that they need play even when they are ill. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140462
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.384
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.755
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, WHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, JOen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, EKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:12:12Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:12:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Nursing, 2011, v. 20 n. 15-16, p. 2135-2143en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/140462-
dc.description.abstractAims. To examine the effectiveness of therapeutic play, using virtual reality computer games, in minimising anxiety and reducing depressive symptoms in Hong Kong Chinese children hospitalised with cancer. Background. There has been an increase in the use of therapeutic play intervention to help children cope with the stress of hospitalisation. However, it is not clear whether therapeutic play is an appropriate psychological intervention for Chinese children hospitalised with cancer. Design. A non-equivalent control group pretest-post-test, between-subject design was employed. Method. Hong Kong Chinese Children (8-16years of age), admitted to a paediatric oncology ward for the treatment of cancer during a 14-month period, were invited to participate in the study. Of the 122 children, 70 formed the control group receiving routine nursing care and 52 in the experimental group receiving therapeutic play interventions. Results. The results showed that children in the experimental group reported statistically significant fewer depressive symptoms than children in the control group on day 7. The results, however, find no differences in children's anxiety scores between the two groups on day 7. Conclusion. The study provides empirical evidence to support the effectiveness of therapeutic play, using virtual reality computer games, in the psychological preparation of children hospitalised with cancer, thus charting a path towards promoting holistic and quality care. Relevance to clinical practice. The findings heighten the awareness in healthcare professionals that play is a very important part of children's life and that they need play even when they are ill. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Nursingen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectCanceren_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectNursesen_HK
dc.subjectNursingen_HK
dc.subjectPsychologicalen_HK
dc.subjectTherapeutic playen_HK
dc.subjectVirtual realityen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPlay and Playthings-
dc.subject.meshUser-Computer Interface-
dc.titleThe effectiveness of therapeutic play, using virtual reality computer games, in promoting the psychological well-being of children hospitalised with canceren_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, WH: william3@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, WH=rp00528en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03733.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21651633-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960369670en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193904en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960369670&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue15-16en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2135en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2143en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292744900005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, WH=8973660200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, JO=35483369600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, EK=45060998500en_HK

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