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Article: Implicit practice for technique adaptation in expert performers
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TitleImplicit practice for technique adaptation in expert performers
 
AuthorsRendell, M2 3
Farrow, D2 4
Masters, R1
Plummer, N
 
KeywordsConscious Control
Expertise
Explicit Knowledge
Implicit Motor Learning
Netball Goal Shooting
Performance Pressure
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherMulti-Science Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.multi-science.co.uk/sports-science&coaching.htm
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Sports Science And Coaching, 2011, v. 6 n. 4, p. 553-566 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/1747-9541.6.4.553
 
AbstractCoaches traditionally rely on explicit approaches (e.g., instruction, video feedback) to adapt technique in skilled athletes. While such methods can generate relatively rapid learning outcomes, the resultant technical execution is susceptible to breakdown under competition pressure. An alternative approach is to use 'implicit motor learning' in which adaptations occur without conscious knowledge of the underlying rules and the newly learned skill is less likely to breakdown under pressure. However, research has not demonstrated whether implicit motor learning can be used to adapt technique in athletes whose skills are already expert. Two expert netball players undertook a 6-week training intervention in which they practiced shooting to an adapted ring (hypothesised to cause an advantageous increase in the trajectory of shots) while responding to a concurrent secondary task (high and low pitched tones). Pre- and post-testing of shooting performance revealed a change in the maximum ball height following the intervention. The players showed no increase in generic or episodic knowledge, remained robust under secondary task load, and were unable to differentiate between pre- and post-test video footage of their shots. These measures indicate that players were unaware of the knowledge underlying adaptations of their technique, but equally highlight the need for further empirical investigation of implicit practice in expert performers.
 
ISSN1747-9541
2013 Impact Factor: 0.516
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.364
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1260/1747-9541.6.4.553
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000296280700008
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorRendell, M
 
dc.contributor.authorFarrow, D
 
dc.contributor.authorMasters, R
 
dc.contributor.authorPlummer, N
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:04:01Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:04:01Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractCoaches traditionally rely on explicit approaches (e.g., instruction, video feedback) to adapt technique in skilled athletes. While such methods can generate relatively rapid learning outcomes, the resultant technical execution is susceptible to breakdown under competition pressure. An alternative approach is to use 'implicit motor learning' in which adaptations occur without conscious knowledge of the underlying rules and the newly learned skill is less likely to breakdown under pressure. However, research has not demonstrated whether implicit motor learning can be used to adapt technique in athletes whose skills are already expert. Two expert netball players undertook a 6-week training intervention in which they practiced shooting to an adapted ring (hypothesised to cause an advantageous increase in the trajectory of shots) while responding to a concurrent secondary task (high and low pitched tones). Pre- and post-testing of shooting performance revealed a change in the maximum ball height following the intervention. The players showed no increase in generic or episodic knowledge, remained robust under secondary task load, and were unable to differentiate between pre- and post-test video footage of their shots. These measures indicate that players were unaware of the knowledge underlying adaptations of their technique, but equally highlight the need for further empirical investigation of implicit practice in expert performers.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Sports Science And Coaching, 2011, v. 6 n. 4, p. 553-566 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1260/1747-9541.6.4.553
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1260/1747-9541.6.4.553
 
dc.identifier.epage566
 
dc.identifier.hkuros196143
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296280700008
 
dc.identifier.issn1747-9541
2013 Impact Factor: 0.516
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.364
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053537075
 
dc.identifier.spage553
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139976
 
dc.identifier.volume6
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherMulti-Science Publishing Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.multi-science.co.uk/sports-science&coaching.htm
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Sports Science and Coaching
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectConscious Control
 
dc.subjectExpertise
 
dc.subjectExplicit Knowledge
 
dc.subjectImplicit Motor Learning
 
dc.subjectNetball Goal Shooting
 
dc.subjectPerformance Pressure
 
dc.titleImplicit practice for technique adaptation in expert performers
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Farrow, D</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Masters, R</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Plummer, N</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2011-09-23T06:04:01Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2011-09-23T06:04:01Z</date.available>
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<subject>Conscious Control</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Victoria University Melbourne
  3. Queensland Academy of Sport
  4. Australian Institute of Sport