File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: A comparison of evaluation, time pressure, and multitasking as stressors of psychomotor operative performance

TitleA comparison of evaluation, time pressure, and multitasking as stressors of psychomotor operative performance
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/surg
Citation
Surgery, 2011, v. 149 n. 6, p. 776-782 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: There is gathering interest in determining the typical sources of stress for an operating surgeon and the effect that stressors might have on operative performance. Much of the research in this field, however, has failed to measure stress levels and performance concurrently or has not acknowledged the differential impact of potential stressors. Our aim was to examine empirically the influence of different sources of stress on trained laparoscopic performance. Methods: A total of 30 medical students were trained to proficiency on the validated Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery peg transfer task, and then were tested under 4 counterbalanced test conditions: control, evaluation threat, multitasking, and time pressure. Performance was assessed via completion time and a process measure reflecting the efficiency of movement (ie, path length). Stress levels in each test condition were measured using a multidimensional approach that included the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the subject's heart rate while performing a task. Results: The time pressure condition caused the only significant increase in stress levels but did not influence completion time or the path length of movement. Only the multitasking condition significantly increased completion time and path length, despite there being no significant increase in stress levels. Overall, the STAI and heart rate measures were not correlated strongly. Conclusion: Recommended measures of stress levels do not necessarily reflect the demands of an operative task, highlighting the need to understand better the mechanisms that influence performance in surgery. This understanding will help inform the development of training programs that encourage the complete transfer of skills from simulators to the operating room. © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139969
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.309
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.620
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
UK Economic and Social Research Council
Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, ChinaRES-000-22-3016
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

Supported by a bilateral research grant from the UK Economic and Social Research Council and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, China (RES-000-22-3016 to M.R.W. and R.S.W.M.) and a grant from the University of Hong Kong Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research (to J.M.P).

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPoolton, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWilson, MRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMalhotra, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNgo, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:03:57Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:03:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSurgery, 2011, v. 149 n. 6, p. 776-782en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0039-6060en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139969-
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is gathering interest in determining the typical sources of stress for an operating surgeon and the effect that stressors might have on operative performance. Much of the research in this field, however, has failed to measure stress levels and performance concurrently or has not acknowledged the differential impact of potential stressors. Our aim was to examine empirically the influence of different sources of stress on trained laparoscopic performance. Methods: A total of 30 medical students were trained to proficiency on the validated Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery peg transfer task, and then were tested under 4 counterbalanced test conditions: control, evaluation threat, multitasking, and time pressure. Performance was assessed via completion time and a process measure reflecting the efficiency of movement (ie, path length). Stress levels in each test condition were measured using a multidimensional approach that included the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the subject's heart rate while performing a task. Results: The time pressure condition caused the only significant increase in stress levels but did not influence completion time or the path length of movement. Only the multitasking condition significantly increased completion time and path length, despite there being no significant increase in stress levels. Overall, the STAI and heart rate measures were not correlated strongly. Conclusion: Recommended measures of stress levels do not necessarily reflect the demands of an operative task, highlighting the need to understand better the mechanisms that influence performance in surgery. This understanding will help inform the development of training programs that encourage the complete transfer of skills from simulators to the operating room. © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/surgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSurgeryen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subject.meshClinical Competence-
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy - education - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performance - physiology-
dc.subject.meshStress, Psychological - psychology-
dc.subject.meshStudents, Medical - psychology-
dc.titleA comparison of evaluation, time pressure, and multitasking as stressors of psychomotor operative performanceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoolton, JM: jamiep@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoolton, JM=rp00949en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.surg.2010.12.005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21310451-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79957717066en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193947en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79957717066&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume149en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage776en_HK
dc.identifier.epage782en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1532-7361-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291520700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectGaze strategies of laparoscopy surgeons: Observational learning, implicit knowledge and performance in demanding conditions-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoolton, JM=8921750800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilson, MR=7408663801en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMalhotra, N=36935977200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgo, K=36935919000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats