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Article: From neighborhood design and food options to residents' weight status

TitleFrom neighborhood design and food options to residents' weight status
Authors
KeywordsAccess and availability of healthful food choices
Community nutrition environment
Consumer nutrition environment
Overweight/obesity
Walkability
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/appet
Citation
Appetite, 2011, v. 56 n. 3, p. 693-703 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examined associations of accessibility, availability, price, and quality of food choices and neighborhood urban design with weight status and utilitarian walking. To account for self-selection bias, data on adult residents of a middle-to-high-income neighborhood were used. Participants kept a 2-day activity/travel diary and self-reported socio-demographics, height, and weight. Geographic Information Systems data were used to objectively quantify walking-related aspects of urban design, and number of and distance to food outlets within respondents' 1. km residential buffers. Food outlets were audited for availability, price, and quality of healthful food choices. Number of convenience stores and in-store healthful food choices were positively related to walking for errands which, in turn, was predictive of lower risk of being overweight/obese. Negative associations with overweight/obesity unexplained by walking were found for number of grocery stores and healthful food choices in sit-down restaurants. Aspects of urban form and food environment were associated with walking for eating purposes which, however, was not predictive of overweight/obesity. Access to diverse destinations, food outlets and healthful food choices may promote pedestrian activity and contribute to better weight regulation. Accessibility and availability of healthful food choices may lower the risk of overweight/obesity by providing opportunities for healthier dietary patterns. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139964
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.125
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.375
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Georgia Department of Transportation
Georgia Regional Transportation Authority
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Funding Information:

We would like to thank the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for funding this study and the Georgia Department of Transportation, the Georgia Regional Transportation Authority, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for funding the data collection upon which it is based.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorFrank, LDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSallis, JFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSaelens, BEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorConway, TLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChapman, JEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGlanz, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:03:53Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:03:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAppetite, 2011, v. 56 n. 3, p. 693-703en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0195-6663en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139964-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined associations of accessibility, availability, price, and quality of food choices and neighborhood urban design with weight status and utilitarian walking. To account for self-selection bias, data on adult residents of a middle-to-high-income neighborhood were used. Participants kept a 2-day activity/travel diary and self-reported socio-demographics, height, and weight. Geographic Information Systems data were used to objectively quantify walking-related aspects of urban design, and number of and distance to food outlets within respondents' 1. km residential buffers. Food outlets were audited for availability, price, and quality of healthful food choices. Number of convenience stores and in-store healthful food choices were positively related to walking for errands which, in turn, was predictive of lower risk of being overweight/obese. Negative associations with overweight/obesity unexplained by walking were found for number of grocery stores and healthful food choices in sit-down restaurants. Aspects of urban form and food environment were associated with walking for eating purposes which, however, was not predictive of overweight/obesity. Access to diverse destinations, food outlets and healthful food choices may promote pedestrian activity and contribute to better weight regulation. Accessibility and availability of healthful food choices may lower the risk of overweight/obesity by providing opportunities for healthier dietary patterns. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/appeten_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAppetiteen_HK
dc.subjectAccess and availability of healthful food choicesen_HK
dc.subjectCommunity nutrition environmenten_HK
dc.subjectConsumer nutrition environmenten_HK
dc.subjectOverweight/obesityen_HK
dc.subjectWalkabilityen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Weight - physiology-
dc.subject.meshDiet - economics - methods-
dc.subject.meshResidence Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshRestaurants-
dc.subject.meshSocial Environment-
dc.titleFrom neighborhood design and food options to residents' weight statusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.appet.2011.02.006en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21335040-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952984863en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros192942en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79952984863&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume56en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage693en_HK
dc.identifier.epage703en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291912700021-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFrank, LD=7201908054en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSallis, JF=7102766542en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaelens, BE=6701427555en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConway, TL=7101933750en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChapman, JE=7402661224en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGlanz, K=7006121878en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8847340-

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