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Article: Play pattern of seated video game and active "Exergame" alternatives
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TitlePlay pattern of seated video game and active "Exergame" alternatives
 
AuthorsLam, JWK1
Sit, CHP1
McManus, AM1
 
KeywordsChoice behavior
Gender
Physical activity
Play and play things
Video games
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherElsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jesf/
 
CitationJournal of Exercise Science and Fitness, 2011, v. 9 n. 1, p. 24-30 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1728-869X(11)60003-8
 
AbstractThe purpose of the study was to compare the play pattern of " exergames" and seated internet-based video games between boys and girls. Seventy-nine participants (40 boys, 39 girls) aged 9 to 12 years (M = 10.85 ± 0.9) were involved in two 1-hour video game sessions. Play pattern in terms of frequency, duration and intensity were assessed from observation, accelerometry and heart rate monitoring. Results indicated that children spent half of the available time playing the activity-promoting exergames (XaviX bowling 47.6 ± 14.9%; XaviX J-Mat 48.8 ± 12.8%). No differences between the boys and girls were apparent for total time played, number of play bouts or duration per bout (p ≥ 0.05). Boys however played both exergames more actively than the girls (XaviX bowling RT3 counts.s -1: boys 10.47 ± 4.71, girls 6.34 ± 2.76; XaviX J-Mat RT3 counts·s -1: boys 66.37 ± 13.84, girls 51.94 ± 17.83). This study concludes that both boys and girls choose to play exergames for similar periods of time, but play style during the XaviX bowling was often inactive in the girls and during the XaviX J-Mat less active in the girls than the boys. Reasons underlying choice of play was similar between the girls and boys. Active video games appear to be suitable for longer-term physical activity interventions in children, but attention will need to be given to the intensity of game play in girls. © 2011 Chinese Taipei Society of Ultrasound in Medicine & Elsevier.
 
ISSN1728-869X
2013 Impact Factor: 0.529
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.234
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1728-869X(11)60003-8
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, JWK
 
dc.contributor.authorSit, CHP
 
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, AM
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:03:46Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:03:46Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to compare the play pattern of " exergames" and seated internet-based video games between boys and girls. Seventy-nine participants (40 boys, 39 girls) aged 9 to 12 years (M = 10.85 ± 0.9) were involved in two 1-hour video game sessions. Play pattern in terms of frequency, duration and intensity were assessed from observation, accelerometry and heart rate monitoring. Results indicated that children spent half of the available time playing the activity-promoting exergames (XaviX bowling 47.6 ± 14.9%; XaviX J-Mat 48.8 ± 12.8%). No differences between the boys and girls were apparent for total time played, number of play bouts or duration per bout (p ≥ 0.05). Boys however played both exergames more actively than the girls (XaviX bowling RT3 counts.s -1: boys 10.47 ± 4.71, girls 6.34 ± 2.76; XaviX J-Mat RT3 counts·s -1: boys 66.37 ± 13.84, girls 51.94 ± 17.83). This study concludes that both boys and girls choose to play exergames for similar periods of time, but play style during the XaviX bowling was often inactive in the girls and during the XaviX J-Mat less active in the girls than the boys. Reasons underlying choice of play was similar between the girls and boys. Active video games appear to be suitable for longer-term physical activity interventions in children, but attention will need to be given to the intensity of game play in girls. © 2011 Chinese Taipei Society of Ultrasound in Medicine & Elsevier.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Exercise Science and Fitness, 2011, v. 9 n. 1, p. 24-30 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1728-869X(11)60003-8
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9456033
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1728-869X(11)60003-8
 
dc.identifier.epage30
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192617
 
dc.identifier.issn1728-869X
2013 Impact Factor: 0.529
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.234
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79958065571
 
dc.identifier.spage24
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139958
 
dc.identifier.volume9
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jesf/
 
dc.publisher.placeSingapore
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Exercise Science and Fitness
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectChoice behavior
 
dc.subjectGender
 
dc.subjectPhysical activity
 
dc.subjectPlay and play things
 
dc.subjectVideo games
 
dc.titlePlay pattern of seated video game and active "Exergame" alternatives
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>The purpose of the study was to compare the play pattern of &quot; exergames&quot; and seated internet-based video games between boys and girls. Seventy-nine participants (40 boys, 39 girls) aged 9 to 12 years (M = 10.85 &#177; 0.9) were involved in two 1-hour video game sessions. Play pattern in terms of frequency, duration and intensity were assessed from observation, accelerometry and heart rate monitoring. Results indicated that children spent half of the available time playing the activity-promoting exergames (XaviX bowling 47.6 &#177; 14.9%; XaviX J-Mat 48.8 &#177; 12.8%). No differences between the boys and girls were apparent for total time played, number of play bouts or duration per bout (p &#8805; 0.05). Boys however played both exergames more actively than the girls (XaviX bowling RT3 counts.s -1: boys 10.47 &#177; 4.71, girls 6.34 &#177; 2.76; XaviX J-Mat RT3 counts&#183;s -1: boys 66.37 &#177; 13.84, girls 51.94 &#177; 17.83). This study concludes that both boys and girls choose to play exergames for similar periods of time, but play style during the XaviX bowling was often inactive in the girls and during the XaviX J-Mat less active in the girls than the boys. Reasons underlying choice of play was similar between the girls and boys. Active video games appear to be suitable for longer-term physical activity interventions in children, but attention will need to be given to the intensity of game play in girls. &#169; 2011 Chinese Taipei Society of Ultrasound in Medicine &amp; Elsevier.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong