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Book: Microarrays for personalized genomic medicine
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TitleMicroarrays for personalized genomic medicine
 
AuthorsLam, CW1
Lau, KC1
Tong, SF1
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherAcademic Press.
 
CitationAdvances In Clinical Chemistry, 2010, v. 52 C, p. 1-18 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2423(10)52001-8
 
AbstractThe combination of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) database and high-density SNP array allows the use of SNPs as informative polymorphic markers for Mendelian diseases with complex traits efficiently. With the high-density and high-resolution SNP arrays, we can detect even the smallest structural changes that would have been missed with conventional low-density cytogenetic techniques for prognostic and diagnostic utilities. Accurate mapping may be useful for genotype-phenotype correlation in individual basis and for prenatal investigations. Here, we review some applications of genome-wide SNP genotyping on detecting homozygous candidate region in consanguineous family priors to mutation analysis. In addition to personalized genomic medicine, studying the genetic heterogeneity in diverse ancestral population helps to implementing effective clinical management. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
 
ISSN0065-2423
2013 Impact Factor: 4.302
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.169
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2423(10)52001-8
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000283462500001
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, CW
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorTong, SF
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T06:01:33Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T06:01:33Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractThe combination of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) database and high-density SNP array allows the use of SNPs as informative polymorphic markers for Mendelian diseases with complex traits efficiently. With the high-density and high-resolution SNP arrays, we can detect even the smallest structural changes that would have been missed with conventional low-density cytogenetic techniques for prognostic and diagnostic utilities. Accurate mapping may be useful for genotype-phenotype correlation in individual basis and for prenatal investigations. Here, we review some applications of genome-wide SNP genotyping on detecting homozygous candidate region in consanguineous family priors to mutation analysis. In addition to personalized genomic medicine, studying the genetic heterogeneity in diverse ancestral population helps to implementing effective clinical management. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAdvances In Clinical Chemistry, 2010, v. 52 C, p. 1-18 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2423(10)52001-8
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2423(10)52001-8
 
dc.identifier.epage18
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192460
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283462500001
 
dc.identifier.issn0065-2423
2013 Impact Factor: 4.302
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.169
 
dc.identifier.issueC
 
dc.identifier.pmid21275337
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77956997886
 
dc.identifier.spage1
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139926
 
dc.identifier.volume52
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAcademic Press.
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Clinical Chemistry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshGenetic Testing - methods
 
dc.subject.meshGenomics - methods
 
dc.subject.meshGenotype
 
dc.subject.meshMicroarray Analysis - methods
 
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Single Nucleotide
 
dc.titleMicroarrays for personalized genomic medicine
 
dc.typeBook
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong