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Article: Testicular signaling is the potential target of perfluorooctanesulfonate-mediated subfertility in male mice

TitleTesticular signaling is the potential target of perfluorooctanesulfonate-mediated subfertility in male mice
Authors
KeywordsEnvironment
Gene regulation
Male sexual function
Sperm
Issue Date2011
PublisherSociety for the Study of Reproduction. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biolreprod.org/
Citation
Biology Of Reproduction, 2011, v. 84 n. 5, p. 1016-1023 How to Cite?
Abstract
Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was produced and used by various industries and in consumer products. Because of its persistence, it is ubiquitous in air, water, soil, wildlife, and humans. Although the adverse effects of PFOS on male fertility have been reported, the underlying mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Here, for the first time, the effects of PFOS on testicular signaling, such as gonadotropin, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor, and inhibins/activins were shown to be directly related to male subfertility. Sexually mature 8-wk-old CD1 male mice were administered by gavages in corn oil daily with 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg/kg PFOS for 7, 14, or 21 days. Serum concentrations of testosterone and epididymal sperm counts were significantly lower in the mice after 21 days of the exposure to the highest dose compared with the controls. The expression levels of testicular receptors for gonadotropin, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 were considerably reduced on Day 21 in mice exposed daily to 10 or 5 mg/kg PFOS. The transcript levels of the subunits of the testicular factors (i.e., inhibins and activins), Inha, Inhba, and Inhbb, were significantly lower on Day 21 of daily exposure to 10, 5, or 1 mg/kg PFOS. The mRNA expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes (i.e., StAR, CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3beta-HSD, and 17beta-HSD) were notably reduced. Therefore, PFOSelicited subfertility in male mice is manifested as progressive deterioration of testicular signaling. © 2011 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139899
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.451
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Baptist UniversityHKBU 1/CRF/08
University Grants Committee
Department of Biology and Chemistry and State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

Supported by the Super Faculty Research Grant, Hong Kong Baptist University and Collaborative Research Fund (HKBU 1/CRF/08), University Grants Committee, to C.K.C.W. J.P.G. was supported by the Canada Research Chair program and an at-large Chair Professorship at the Department of Biology and Chemistry and State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong.

References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. University of Saskatchewan
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Hong Kong Baptist University
  4. City University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWan, HTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhao, YGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, MHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WSBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGiesy, JPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:59:49Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:59:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiology Of Reproduction, 2011, v. 84 n. 5, p. 1016-1023en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0006-3363en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139899-
dc.description.abstractPerfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was produced and used by various industries and in consumer products. Because of its persistence, it is ubiquitous in air, water, soil, wildlife, and humans. Although the adverse effects of PFOS on male fertility have been reported, the underlying mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Here, for the first time, the effects of PFOS on testicular signaling, such as gonadotropin, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor, and inhibins/activins were shown to be directly related to male subfertility. Sexually mature 8-wk-old CD1 male mice were administered by gavages in corn oil daily with 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg/kg PFOS for 7, 14, or 21 days. Serum concentrations of testosterone and epididymal sperm counts were significantly lower in the mice after 21 days of the exposure to the highest dose compared with the controls. The expression levels of testicular receptors for gonadotropin, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 were considerably reduced on Day 21 in mice exposed daily to 10 or 5 mg/kg PFOS. The transcript levels of the subunits of the testicular factors (i.e., inhibins and activins), Inha, Inhba, and Inhbb, were significantly lower on Day 21 of daily exposure to 10, 5, or 1 mg/kg PFOS. The mRNA expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes (i.e., StAR, CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3beta-HSD, and 17beta-HSD) were notably reduced. Therefore, PFOSelicited subfertility in male mice is manifested as progressive deterioration of testicular signaling. © 2011 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSociety for the Study of Reproduction. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biolreprod.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiology of Reproductionen_HK
dc.subjectEnvironmenten_HK
dc.subjectGene regulationen_HK
dc.subjectMale sexual functionen_HK
dc.subjectSpermen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Pollutants - administration and dosage - toxicity-
dc.subject.meshHypothalamo-Hypophyseal System - physiology-
dc.subject.meshInfertility, Male - chemically induced - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshSignal Transduction - drug effects-
dc.subject.meshTestis - physiology-
dc.titleTesticular signaling is the potential target of perfluorooctanesulfonate-mediated subfertility in male miceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYeung, WSB:wsbyeung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, WSB=rp00331en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1095/biolreprod.110.089219en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21209418en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79956317679en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195569en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79956317679&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume84en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1016en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1023en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000289728600021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, HT=24483853000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, YG=53664729300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MH=7403908633en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, KF=7501503219en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, WSB=7102370745en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGiesy, JP=35459135300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CKC=35276549400en_HK

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