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Conference Paper: Spatial proximity and childhood hospital admissions in a densely populated conurbation: evidence fro m Hong Kong’s “Children of 1997” birth cohort

TitleSpatial proximity and childhood hospital admissions in a densely populated conurbation: evidence fro m Hong Kong’s “Children of 1997” birth cohort
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences public health and safety
Issue Date2011
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
The 19th IEA World Congress of Epidemiology, Edinburgh, Scotland, 7-11 August 2011. In Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, v. 65 suppl. 1, p. A421, abstract no. SP3-47 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: Physical distance is a barrier to hospital utilisation. In a very densely populated city in China, we examined whether use of public hospitals by children was associated with individual-level residential proximity, and whether these associations varied with type of admission. METHODS: The authors used multivariable negative binomial regression in a large, population-representative birth cohort to examine the adjusted associations of proximity to hospitals with Accidents and Emergency services, proxied by distance to the nearest such hospital, with hospital admissions, bed-days and average length of stay from 8 days to 8 years of age. RESULTS: Physical proximity was positively associated with emergency admissions in children (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.23, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.35 for <1 km compared to $2 km) and bed-days but not with average length of stay, adjusted for age, sex and socio-economic position. However, in a similar comparison there was no such association for other (ie, planned) admissions (IRR 1.04, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.27). CONCLUSION: Proximity was associated with hospital use for emergency admissions. Given the societal costs of such use and the risks of iatrogenesis, attention should focus on achieving a more effective use of scarce resources.
DescriptionConference Theme: Changing populations, changing diseases: Epidemiology for Tomorrow’s World
Poster Presentation: abstract no. SP3-47
This journal suppl. contain programme and abstracts of the IEA World Congress of Epidemiology, 2011
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139897
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYau, CYSen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwok, MKen_US
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:59:38Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:59:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 19th IEA World Congress of Epidemiology, Edinburgh, Scotland, 7-11 August 2011. In Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, v. 65 suppl. 1, p. A421, abstract no. SP3-47-
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139897-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Changing populations, changing diseases: Epidemiology for Tomorrow’s World-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation: abstract no. SP3-47-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. contain programme and abstracts of the IEA World Congress of Epidemiology, 2011-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Physical distance is a barrier to hospital utilisation. In a very densely populated city in China, we examined whether use of public hospitals by children was associated with individual-level residential proximity, and whether these associations varied with type of admission. METHODS: The authors used multivariable negative binomial regression in a large, population-representative birth cohort to examine the adjusted associations of proximity to hospitals with Accidents and Emergency services, proxied by distance to the nearest such hospital, with hospital admissions, bed-days and average length of stay from 8 days to 8 years of age. RESULTS: Physical proximity was positively associated with emergency admissions in children (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.23, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.35 for <1 km compared to $2 km) and bed-days but not with average length of stay, adjusted for age, sex and socio-economic position. However, in a similar comparison there was no such association for other (ie, planned) admissions (IRR 1.04, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.27). CONCLUSION: Proximity was associated with hospital use for emergency admissions. Given the societal costs of such use and the risks of iatrogenesis, attention should focus on achieving a more effective use of scarce resources.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology & Community Healthen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Epidemiology & Community Health. Copyright © BMJ Publishing Group.-
dc.subjectMedical sciences public health and safety-
dc.titleSpatial proximity and childhood hospital admissions in a densely populated conurbation: evidence fro m Hong Kong’s “Children of 1997” birth cohorten_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYau, CYS: cynthyau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailKwok, MK: maggiek@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2011.142976o.47-
dc.identifier.hkuros196133en_US
dc.identifier.volume65en_US
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1en_US
dc.identifier.spageA421, abstract no. SP3-47en_US
dc.identifier.epageA421, abstract no. SP3-47en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293901802197-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.description.otherThe IEA World Congress of Epidemiology, Edinburgh, U.K., 7-11 August 2011. In Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, v. 65 suppl. 1, p. A421, abstract no. SP3-47-

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