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Article: Usefulness of physical fitness and the metabolic syndrome to predict vascular disease risk in older Chinese (from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort [GBCS-CVD])
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TitleUsefulness of physical fitness and the metabolic syndrome to predict vascular disease risk in older Chinese (from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort [GBCS-CVD])
 
AuthorsO'Hartaigh, B3
Jiang, CQ2
Thomas, GN3
Tsvetanov, KA3
Bosch, JA3
Cheng, KK3
Lam, TH1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherExcerpta Medica, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajconline.org/
 
CitationAmerican Journal Of Cardiology, 2011, v. 108 n. 6, p. 845-850 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2011.05.010
 
AbstractPhysical fitness can independently lower the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We explored the independent and combined associations of physical fitness, measured using the seated at rest heart rate (RHR), and the metabolic syndrome (MS), with CVD risk, as described by an elevated pulse wave velocity (PWV) in older Chinese. Data from 1,996 participants were drawn from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort. Analysis of variance and logistic regression analysis were used to establish the independent and combined associations of the RHR and the MS with PWV. The RHR was independently associated with an elevated PWV (odds ratio [OR] 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22 to 2.18), as was the MS (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.76 to 3.17). The participants with a high RHR, but without the MS, had an adjusted OR of 1.63 (95% CI 1.15 to 2.30) for the presence of the CVD proxy. Those with a low RHR and the MS had an adjusted OR of 2.35 (95% CI 1.66 to 3.33). The risk of an elevated PWV increased almost fourfold with both a high RHR and a diagnosis of the MS (OR 3.87, 95% CI 2.39 to 6.28, p = 0.52 for interaction). In conclusion, physical fitness, measured using the RHR, and the MS are independently associated with an elevated PWV, a surrogate marker for CVD. The strength of this association was further increased in the presence of both. These findings confirm the beneficial effects of physical fitness on attenuating the risk of CVD among older Chinese. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.
 
ISSN0002-9149
2013 Impact Factor: 3.425
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.315
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2011.05.010
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000295352700015
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China/Research Grants Council (Hong Kong, China)30518001
HKU720/05
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Educational Development and Research (Hong Kong, China)
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau (Guangzhou, China)
University of Birmingham (Birmingham, United Kingdom)
Funding Information:

The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study was funded by grants 30518001 and HKU720/05 from the National Natural Science Foundation of China/Research Grants Council (Hong Kong, China); the University of Hong Kong Foundation for Educational Development and Research (Hong Kong, China); the Guangzhou Public Health Bureau and the Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau (Guangzhou, China); and the University of Birmingham (Birmingham, United Kingdom).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorO'Hartaigh, B
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQ
 
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GN
 
dc.contributor.authorTsvetanov, KA
 
dc.contributor.authorBosch, JA
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KK
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:59:06Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:59:06Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractPhysical fitness can independently lower the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We explored the independent and combined associations of physical fitness, measured using the seated at rest heart rate (RHR), and the metabolic syndrome (MS), with CVD risk, as described by an elevated pulse wave velocity (PWV) in older Chinese. Data from 1,996 participants were drawn from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort. Analysis of variance and logistic regression analysis were used to establish the independent and combined associations of the RHR and the MS with PWV. The RHR was independently associated with an elevated PWV (odds ratio [OR] 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22 to 2.18), as was the MS (OR 2.36, 95% CI 1.76 to 3.17). The participants with a high RHR, but without the MS, had an adjusted OR of 1.63 (95% CI 1.15 to 2.30) for the presence of the CVD proxy. Those with a low RHR and the MS had an adjusted OR of 2.35 (95% CI 1.66 to 3.33). The risk of an elevated PWV increased almost fourfold with both a high RHR and a diagnosis of the MS (OR 3.87, 95% CI 2.39 to 6.28, p = 0.52 for interaction). In conclusion, physical fitness, measured using the RHR, and the MS are independently associated with an elevated PWV, a surrogate marker for CVD. The strength of this association was further increased in the presence of both. These findings confirm the beneficial effects of physical fitness on attenuating the risk of CVD among older Chinese. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Cardiology, 2011, v. 108 n. 6, p. 845-850 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2011.05.010
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9617595
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2011.05.010
 
dc.identifier.epage850
 
dc.identifier.hkuros196073
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295352700015
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China/Research Grants Council (Hong Kong, China)30518001
HKU720/05
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Educational Development and Research (Hong Kong, China)
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau (Guangzhou, China)
University of Birmingham (Birmingham, United Kingdom)
Funding Information:

The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study was funded by grants 30518001 and HKU720/05 from the National Natural Science Foundation of China/Research Grants Council (Hong Kong, China); the University of Hong Kong Foundation for Educational Development and Research (Hong Kong, China); the Guangzhou Public Health Bureau and the Guangzhou Science and Technology Bureau (Guangzhou, China); and the University of Birmingham (Birmingham, United Kingdom).

 
dc.identifier.issn0002-9149
2013 Impact Factor: 3.425
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.315
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.pmid21784386
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052297899
 
dc.identifier.spage845
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139876
 
dc.identifier.volume108
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherExcerpta Medica, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajconline.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Cardiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance
 
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
 
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHeart Rate - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLogistic Models
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitness
 
dc.subject.meshPlethysmography
 
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value of Tests
 
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessment
 
dc.titleUsefulness of physical fitness and the metabolic syndrome to predict vascular disease risk in older Chinese (from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-Cardiovascular Disease Subcohort [GBCS-CVD])
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Cheng, KK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, TH</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital
  3. University of Birmingham