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Article: Antibiotics nonadherence and knowledge in a community with the world's leading prevalence of antibiotics resistance: Implications for public health intervention

TitleAntibiotics nonadherence and knowledge in a community with the world's leading prevalence of antibiotics resistance: Implications for public health intervention
Authors
KeywordsAntibiotics resistance
Community
Education
Knowledge
Nonadherence
Issue Date2012
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ajic
Citation
American Journal Of Infection Control, 2012, v. 40 n. 2, p. 113-117 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Community determinants of antibiotics nonadherence, an important contributor of antibiotics resistance, remained unclear. Objectives: Our objective was to investigate whether deficient antibiotics knowledge could contribute to nonadherence in a community with high prevalence of antibiotics resistance. Methods: We recruited 465 people by random sampling from 5 urban areas in Hong Kong. A structured questionnaire was used to assess antibiotics knowledge and adherence. Adherence was defined as completing the most recent course of antibiotics entirely according to physicians' instructions. An antibiotics knowledge score ranging from 0 to 3 (highest) was composed based on the number of correctly answered questions. Results: Of the 465 participants interviewed, 96.3% had heard of the term "antibiotics," and 80.6% recalled having previously received antibiotics prescription. Among the eligible 369 subjects, 32.9% showed nonadherence. Percentages of participants with antibiotics knowledge scores of 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 11%, 27%, 33%, and 29%, respectively. There was a higher prevalence of nonadherence among people with lower antibiotics knowledge score (P <.001). Furthermore, people with nonadherence had a significantly lower mean antibiotics knowledge score (1.3 ± 1.0 versus 2.0 ± 0.9, P <.001), with no interaction with education (P <.05). Adjusted for potential confounders, antibiotics knowledge scores of 2, 1, and 0 independently predicted increased risk of nonadherence by 1-fold (odds ratio [OR], 2.00; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-3.94; P =.047), 4-fold (OR, 4.77; 95% CI: 2.30-9.92; P <.001), and 17-fold (OR, 18.41; 95% CI: 6.92-48.97; P <.001) respectively, compared with the maximum score of 3. Conclusion: Lack of antibiotics knowledge is a critical determinant of nonadherence independent of education in the community. © 2012 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139864
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.995
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.259
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, MMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFok, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLok, ZLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNi, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorSin, CFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, TTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:58:48Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:58:48Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Infection Control, 2012, v. 40 n. 2, p. 113-117en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0196-6553en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139864-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Community determinants of antibiotics nonadherence, an important contributor of antibiotics resistance, remained unclear. Objectives: Our objective was to investigate whether deficient antibiotics knowledge could contribute to nonadherence in a community with high prevalence of antibiotics resistance. Methods: We recruited 465 people by random sampling from 5 urban areas in Hong Kong. A structured questionnaire was used to assess antibiotics knowledge and adherence. Adherence was defined as completing the most recent course of antibiotics entirely according to physicians' instructions. An antibiotics knowledge score ranging from 0 to 3 (highest) was composed based on the number of correctly answered questions. Results: Of the 465 participants interviewed, 96.3% had heard of the term "antibiotics," and 80.6% recalled having previously received antibiotics prescription. Among the eligible 369 subjects, 32.9% showed nonadherence. Percentages of participants with antibiotics knowledge scores of 0, 1, 2, and 3 were 11%, 27%, 33%, and 29%, respectively. There was a higher prevalence of nonadherence among people with lower antibiotics knowledge score (P <.001). Furthermore, people with nonadherence had a significantly lower mean antibiotics knowledge score (1.3 ± 1.0 versus 2.0 ± 0.9, P <.001), with no interaction with education (P <.05). Adjusted for potential confounders, antibiotics knowledge scores of 2, 1, and 0 independently predicted increased risk of nonadherence by 1-fold (odds ratio [OR], 2.00; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-3.94; P =.047), 4-fold (OR, 4.77; 95% CI: 2.30-9.92; P <.001), and 17-fold (OR, 18.41; 95% CI: 6.92-48.97; P <.001) respectively, compared with the maximum score of 3. Conclusion: Lack of antibiotics knowledge is a critical determinant of nonadherence independent of education in the community. © 2012 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ajicen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Infection Controlen_HK
dc.subjectAntibiotics resistanceen_HK
dc.subjectCommunityen_HK
dc.subjectEducationen_HK
dc.subjectKnowledgeen_HK
dc.subjectNonadherenceen_HK
dc.titleAntibiotics nonadherence and knowledge in a community with the world's leading prevalence of antibiotics resistance: Implications for public health interventionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, YH:chanwill@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailNi, M:nimy@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YH=rp01313en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNi, M=rp01639en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ajic.2011.03.017en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21741119-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857784951en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros194715en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros230864-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857784951&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage113en_HK
dc.identifier.epage117en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1527-3296-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300849800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, YH=22633700600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, MM=42161417700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFok, CM=42161303400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLok, ZL=42161591600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNi, M=42161952600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSin, CF=42162056600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KK=42162126700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SM=37003965400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, R=42162376400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, TT=42162493700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, WC=14048056000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=55057318500en_HK

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