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Article: The age-specific cumulative incidence of infection with pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 was similar in various countries prior to vaccination

TitleThe age-specific cumulative incidence of infection with pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 was similar in various countries prior to vaccination
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 8 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: During the influenza pandemic of 2009 estimates of symptomatic and asymptomatic infection were needed to guide vaccination policies and inform other control measures. Serological studies are the most reliable way to measure influenza infection independent of symptoms. We reviewed all published serological studies that estimated the cumulative incidence of infection with pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 prior to the initiation of population-based vaccination against the pandemic strain. Methodology and Principal Findings: We searched for studies that estimated the cumulative incidence of pandemic influenza infection in the wider community. We excluded studies that did not include both pre- and post-pandemic serological sampling and studies that included response to vaccination. We identified 47 potentially eligible studies and included 12 of them in the review. Where there had been a significant first wave, the cumulative incidence of pandemic influenza infection was reported in the range 16%-28% in pre-school aged children, 34%-43% in school aged children and 12%-15% in young adults. Only 2%-3% of older adults were infected. The proportion of the entire population infected ranged from 11%-18%. We re-estimated the cumulative incidence to account for the small proportion of infections that may not have been detected by serology, and performed direct age-standardisation to the study population. For those countries where it could be calculated, this suggested a population cumulative incidence in the range 11%-21%. Conclusions and Significance: Around the world, the cumulative incidence of infection (which is higher than the cumulative incidence of clinical disease) was below that anticipated prior to the pandemic. Serological studies need to be routine in order to be sufficiently timely to provide support for decisions about vaccination. © 2011 Kelly et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139859
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing
Funding Information:

The WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza is supported by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeck, HAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaurie, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:58:36Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:58:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 8en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139859-
dc.description.abstractBackground: During the influenza pandemic of 2009 estimates of symptomatic and asymptomatic infection were needed to guide vaccination policies and inform other control measures. Serological studies are the most reliable way to measure influenza infection independent of symptoms. We reviewed all published serological studies that estimated the cumulative incidence of infection with pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 prior to the initiation of population-based vaccination against the pandemic strain. Methodology and Principal Findings: We searched for studies that estimated the cumulative incidence of pandemic influenza infection in the wider community. We excluded studies that did not include both pre- and post-pandemic serological sampling and studies that included response to vaccination. We identified 47 potentially eligible studies and included 12 of them in the review. Where there had been a significant first wave, the cumulative incidence of pandemic influenza infection was reported in the range 16%-28% in pre-school aged children, 34%-43% in school aged children and 12%-15% in young adults. Only 2%-3% of older adults were infected. The proportion of the entire population infected ranged from 11%-18%. We re-estimated the cumulative incidence to account for the small proportion of infections that may not have been detected by serology, and performed direct age-standardisation to the study population. For those countries where it could be calculated, this suggested a population cumulative incidence in the range 11%-21%. Conclusions and Significance: Around the world, the cumulative incidence of infection (which is higher than the cumulative incidence of clinical disease) was below that anticipated prior to the pandemic. Serological studies need to be routine in order to be sufficiently timely to provide support for decisions about vaccination. © 2011 Kelly et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAge Distribution-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - pathogenicity-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshPandemics - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshVaccination-
dc.titleThe age-specific cumulative incidence of infection with pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 was similar in various countries prior to vaccinationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H:nishiura@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ:bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0021828en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21850217-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3151238-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79961159098en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros192595en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79961159098&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee21828en_US
dc.identifier.epagee21828en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293563300001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKelly, H=7102077116en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeck, HA=48661362000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaurie, KL=6602569925en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, P=48661636600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK

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