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Article: Weight misperception and psychosocial health in normal weight Chinese adolescents

TitleWeight misperception and psychosocial health in normal weight Chinese adolescents
Authors
KeywordsAdolescents
Body image
Chinese
Psychosocial health problems
Weight misperception
Issue Date2011
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17477166.asp
Citation
International Journal Of Pediatric Obesity, 2011, v. 6 n. 2 -2, p. e381-e389 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. To investigate the association between weight misperception and psychosocial health problems among normal weight Chinese adolescent boys and girls. Methods. In the Youth Smoking Survey 200304, 20 677 normal weight students aged 1118 years from 85 randomly selected schools throughout Hong Kong were analysed. Students who perceived themselves as very thin, thin, fat or very fat were classified as having weight misperception in contrast to the reference group who correctly perceived themselves as normal weight. Psychosocial health outcomes included headache, feeling stressful, feeling depressed, poorer appetite, sleepless at night, having nightmares and less confidence in getting along with friends. Logistic regression yielded adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for each outcome by weight misperception in boys and girls separately. Results. In girls, misperceived fatness was associated with all outcomes, while misperceived thinness was associated with poorer appetite and less confidence. Boys who misperceived themselves as very thin or fat had greater odds of all outcomes except having nightmares. In general, greater ORs were observed for misperceived fatness than thinness in girls, but similar ORs were observed in boys. Misperceived thinness and fatness accounted for 0.6% to 45.1% of the psychosocial health problems in adolescents. Conclusions. Normal weight adolescents with weight misperception were more likely to have psychosocial health problems, and the associations were stronger for extreme misperceptions (i.e., very fat or very thin) in both boys and girls. © 2011 Informa Healthcare.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139858
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.025
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health
Department of Health
Funding Information:

The study was supported by the Hong Kong Council on Smoking and Health and the Department of Health. We would like to thank MK Lai for project management, LM Ho for his help and advice, and the schools and students for their participation.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMak, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, HKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, YKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:58:35Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:58:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Pediatric Obesity, 2011, v. 6 n. 2 -2, p. e381-e389en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1747-7166en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139858-
dc.description.abstractObjective. To investigate the association between weight misperception and psychosocial health problems among normal weight Chinese adolescent boys and girls. Methods. In the Youth Smoking Survey 200304, 20 677 normal weight students aged 1118 years from 85 randomly selected schools throughout Hong Kong were analysed. Students who perceived themselves as very thin, thin, fat or very fat were classified as having weight misperception in contrast to the reference group who correctly perceived themselves as normal weight. Psychosocial health outcomes included headache, feeling stressful, feeling depressed, poorer appetite, sleepless at night, having nightmares and less confidence in getting along with friends. Logistic regression yielded adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for each outcome by weight misperception in boys and girls separately. Results. In girls, misperceived fatness was associated with all outcomes, while misperceived thinness was associated with poorer appetite and less confidence. Boys who misperceived themselves as very thin or fat had greater odds of all outcomes except having nightmares. In general, greater ORs were observed for misperceived fatness than thinness in girls, but similar ORs were observed in boys. Misperceived thinness and fatness accounted for 0.6% to 45.1% of the psychosocial health problems in adolescents. Conclusions. Normal weight adolescents with weight misperception were more likely to have psychosocial health problems, and the associations were stronger for extreme misperceptions (i.e., very fat or very thin) in both boys and girls. © 2011 Informa Healthcare.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/17477166.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Pediatric Obesityen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Pediatric Obesity. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.-
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_HK
dc.subjectBody imageen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectPsychosocial health problemsen_HK
dc.subjectWeight misperceptionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Behavior - ethnology-
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology-
dc.subject.meshBody Weight-
dc.subject.meshMental Health-
dc.subject.meshPerception-
dc.titleWeight misperception and psychosocial health in normal weight Chinese adolescentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, HK:laihk@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, HK=rp01527en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/17477166.2010.514342en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20854167-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959978943en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros192548en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959978943&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2 -2en_HK
dc.identifier.spagee381en_HK
dc.identifier.epagee389en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292704500047-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, WS=16022233800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, KK=19934230600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, HK=11739685900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, YK=34067687100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK

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