File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Ecological energetics of tropical intensive green roof

TitleEcological energetics of tropical intensive green roof
Authors
KeywordsCanopy microclimate
Ecological energetics
Intensive green roof
Passive cooling
Thermal insulation
Tropical green roof
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier SA. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enbuild
Citation
Energy And Buildings, 2011, v. 43 n. 10, p. 2696-2704 How to Cite?
AbstractFew green roof studies cover intensive and tropical types and specific canopy microclimate.Weexamined the ecological energetics of a sky woodland in humid-tropical Hong Kong. Environmental sensors monitored the microclimatic and soil parameters for 14 months. Key biophysical variables of transpiration, wind, light, and through-canopy energy flux are modeled to investigate seasonal and weather effects. The woodland forms a cloistered subcanopy environment with rather stable microclimate. Transpiration and latent heat loss are enhanced by solar radiation and low relative humidity, but less by wind. On sunny days, about 20% of incident solar radiation can reach the soil surface. The canopy reflected more nearinfrared radiation (NIR) than photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), highlighting a hitherto neglected passive-cooling mechanism. The highest transpiration rate occurs in autumn rather than summer due to dry-mild weather. The woodland canopy could reduce 300Wm-2 energy flux into the substrate. The canopy warmed by solar energy transmits heat to subcanopy air. Latent and sensible heat loss in the subcanopy domain is suppressed, thus dampening the passive-cooling effect. The capability of the tropical intensive green roof to reduce temperature is relatively inefficient comparing with temperate region counterparts. The findings could inform design and choice of green roofs. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139850
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.973
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Stanley Ho Alumni Challenge Fund
Government Matching Grant
Funding Information:

We would like to acknowledge with gratitude the research grants furnished generously by the China Light and Power Company Limited, Stanley Ho Alumni Challenge Fund, the Government Matching Grant, and the laborious field work assistance kindly provided by Jeannette Liu and W.Y. Wong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, SWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:58:04Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:58:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnergy And Buildings, 2011, v. 43 n. 10, p. 2696-2704en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-7788en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139850-
dc.description.abstractFew green roof studies cover intensive and tropical types and specific canopy microclimate.Weexamined the ecological energetics of a sky woodland in humid-tropical Hong Kong. Environmental sensors monitored the microclimatic and soil parameters for 14 months. Key biophysical variables of transpiration, wind, light, and through-canopy energy flux are modeled to investigate seasonal and weather effects. The woodland forms a cloistered subcanopy environment with rather stable microclimate. Transpiration and latent heat loss are enhanced by solar radiation and low relative humidity, but less by wind. On sunny days, about 20% of incident solar radiation can reach the soil surface. The canopy reflected more nearinfrared radiation (NIR) than photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), highlighting a hitherto neglected passive-cooling mechanism. The highest transpiration rate occurs in autumn rather than summer due to dry-mild weather. The woodland canopy could reduce 300Wm-2 energy flux into the substrate. The canopy warmed by solar energy transmits heat to subcanopy air. Latent and sensible heat loss in the subcanopy domain is suppressed, thus dampening the passive-cooling effect. The capability of the tropical intensive green roof to reduce temperature is relatively inefficient comparing with temperate region counterparts. The findings could inform design and choice of green roofs. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier SA. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enbuilden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnergy and Buildingsen_HK
dc.subjectCanopy microclimateen_HK
dc.subjectEcological energeticsen_HK
dc.subjectIntensive green roofen_HK
dc.subjectPassive coolingen_HK
dc.subjectThermal insulationen_HK
dc.subjectTropical green roofen_HK
dc.titleEcological energetics of tropical intensive green roofen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY: hragjcy@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsang, SW: victsang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, SW=rp00875en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.enbuild.2011.06.018en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80054797286en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195116en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80054797286&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume43en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2696en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2704en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1872-6178-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295297700017-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, SW=36926417600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9505037-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats