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Article: Biophysical properties and thermal performance of an intensive green roof

TitleBiophysical properties and thermal performance of an intensive green roof
Authors
KeywordsBiophysical properties
Energy budget model
Intensive green roof
Sky woodland
Thermal insulation performance
Issue Date2011
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
Citation
Building And Environment, 2011, v. 46 n. 6, p. 1263-1274 How to Cite?
AbstractGreen roofs have been increasingly enlisted to alleviate urban environmental problems associated with urban heat island effect and stormwater quantity and quality. Most studies focus on extensive green roofs, with inadequate assessment of the complex intensive type, subtropical region, and thermal insulation effect. This study examines the physical properties, biological processes, and thermal insulation performance of an intensive green roof through four seasons. An experimental woodland installed on a Hong Kong building rooftop was equipped with environmental sensors to monitor microclimatic and soil parameters. The excellent thermal performance of the intensive green roof is verified. Even though our site has a 100 cm thick soil to support tree growth, we found that a thin soil layer of 10 cm is sufficient to reduce heat penetration into building. Seasonal weather variations notably control transpiration and associated cooling effect. The tree canopy reduces solar radiation reaching the soil surface, but the trapped air increases air temperature near the soil surface. The substrate operates an effective heat sink to dampen temperature fluctuations. In winter, the subtropical green roof triggers notable heat loss from the substrate into the ambient air, and draws heat upwards from warmer indoor air to increase energy consumption to warm indoor air. This finding deviates from temperate latitude studies. The results offer hints to optimize the design and thermal performance of intensive green roofs. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139847
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.394
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.121
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
China Light and Power Company Limited
Stanley Ho Alumni Challenge Fund
Funding Information:

We would like to acknowledge with gratitude the research grants furnished generously by the China Light and Power Company Limited and Stanley Ho Alumni Challenge Fund, and the laborious field work assistance kindly provided by Jeannette Liu and W.Y. Wong.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsang, SWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:58:03Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:58:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBuilding And Environment, 2011, v. 46 n. 6, p. 1263-1274en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0360-1323en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139847-
dc.description.abstractGreen roofs have been increasingly enlisted to alleviate urban environmental problems associated with urban heat island effect and stormwater quantity and quality. Most studies focus on extensive green roofs, with inadequate assessment of the complex intensive type, subtropical region, and thermal insulation effect. This study examines the physical properties, biological processes, and thermal insulation performance of an intensive green roof through four seasons. An experimental woodland installed on a Hong Kong building rooftop was equipped with environmental sensors to monitor microclimatic and soil parameters. The excellent thermal performance of the intensive green roof is verified. Even though our site has a 100 cm thick soil to support tree growth, we found that a thin soil layer of 10 cm is sufficient to reduce heat penetration into building. Seasonal weather variations notably control transpiration and associated cooling effect. The tree canopy reduces solar radiation reaching the soil surface, but the trapped air increases air temperature near the soil surface. The substrate operates an effective heat sink to dampen temperature fluctuations. In winter, the subtropical green roof triggers notable heat loss from the substrate into the ambient air, and draws heat upwards from warmer indoor air to increase energy consumption to warm indoor air. This finding deviates from temperate latitude studies. The results offer hints to optimize the design and thermal performance of intensive green roofs. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBuilding and Environmenten_HK
dc.subjectBiophysical propertiesen_HK
dc.subjectEnergy budget modelen_HK
dc.subjectIntensive green roofen_HK
dc.subjectSky woodlanden_HK
dc.subjectThermal insulation performanceen_HK
dc.titleBiophysical properties and thermal performance of an intensive green roofen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY: hragjcy@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTsang, SW: victsang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, SW=rp00875en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.buildenv.2010.12.013en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79551603606en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195113en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79551603606&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume46en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1263en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1274en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1873-684X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287897200004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, SW=36926417600en_HK

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