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Article: Bioreceptivity of buildings for spontaneous arboreal flora in compact city environment

TitleBioreceptivity of buildings for spontaneous arboreal flora in compact city environment
Authors
KeywordsArboreal colonization
Bioreceptivity
Building microhabitat
Ruderal vegetation
Spontaneous vegetation
Urban biodiversity
Issue Date2011
PublisherUrban und Fischer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ufug
Citation
Urban Forestry And Urban Greening, 2011, v. 10 n. 1, p. 19-28 How to Cite?
AbstractThe ruderal habitats in cities, extending from the ground level to buildings and walls, are colonized by a special flora which adds a new dimension to urban ecology and urban biodiversity. This study investigates the spontaneous arboreal flora on buildings of different configurations and ages in compact urban Hong Kong. The hanging plants' association with intrinsic building bioreceptivity traits, extrinsic environmental factors and human intervention were evaluated. Building plants in three districts with varied urban form and building type were assessed in the field. They cling on diverse microhabitats led by vertical wall faces and roof, and a group of horizontal substrates accommodating 57% of the plants. The flora is dictated by the tree growth form, contributing 10 of the 11 species. Moraceae (76.2%) and its seven Ficus species (74.4%) are dominant. The most abundant members are pan-tropical native tree Ficus microcarpa, and the exotic but naturalized para-shrub Catharanthus roseus. Species composition on buildings is mainly native and is similar to the ground-level ruderal sites. Their successful growth on buildings is attributed to the strangler habit that is pre-adapted to grip building appendages, and the initial epiphytic existence. The host trees in their natural tropical forest abode have been substituted by buildings niches in the city. The copious fig crops are consumed by frugivorous birds and bats serving as effective dispersal agent and germination mediator. Solar access, debris pockets, damp surfaces, and leakage from drain pipes foster germination and establishment. The bioreceptivity of old buildings with poor construction materials and maintenance is enhanced by weathered substrates to facilitate colonization. Erratic shoot removal by building management has suppressed crown size of most trees. The findings improve understanding of the intricate ecological-cum-cultural dynamics and nature-in-city enrichment of a marginal but notable urban habitat, and contribute to their conservation. © 2010 Elsevier GmbH.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139844
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.006
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.193
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
General Research Grant
Funding Information:

We thank the General Research Grant administered by the University Grants Council of Hong Kong for financial support of this study. The field work assistance kindly provided by Jeannette Liu is hereby gratefully acknowledged.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, WYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:57:59Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:57:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationUrban Forestry And Urban Greening, 2011, v. 10 n. 1, p. 19-28en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1618-8667en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139844-
dc.description.abstractThe ruderal habitats in cities, extending from the ground level to buildings and walls, are colonized by a special flora which adds a new dimension to urban ecology and urban biodiversity. This study investigates the spontaneous arboreal flora on buildings of different configurations and ages in compact urban Hong Kong. The hanging plants' association with intrinsic building bioreceptivity traits, extrinsic environmental factors and human intervention were evaluated. Building plants in three districts with varied urban form and building type were assessed in the field. They cling on diverse microhabitats led by vertical wall faces and roof, and a group of horizontal substrates accommodating 57% of the plants. The flora is dictated by the tree growth form, contributing 10 of the 11 species. Moraceae (76.2%) and its seven Ficus species (74.4%) are dominant. The most abundant members are pan-tropical native tree Ficus microcarpa, and the exotic but naturalized para-shrub Catharanthus roseus. Species composition on buildings is mainly native and is similar to the ground-level ruderal sites. Their successful growth on buildings is attributed to the strangler habit that is pre-adapted to grip building appendages, and the initial epiphytic existence. The host trees in their natural tropical forest abode have been substituted by buildings niches in the city. The copious fig crops are consumed by frugivorous birds and bats serving as effective dispersal agent and germination mediator. Solar access, debris pockets, damp surfaces, and leakage from drain pipes foster germination and establishment. The bioreceptivity of old buildings with poor construction materials and maintenance is enhanced by weathered substrates to facilitate colonization. Erratic shoot removal by building management has suppressed crown size of most trees. The findings improve understanding of the intricate ecological-cum-cultural dynamics and nature-in-city enrichment of a marginal but notable urban habitat, and contribute to their conservation. © 2010 Elsevier GmbH.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUrban und Fischer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ufugen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Forestry and Urban Greeningen_HK
dc.subjectArboreal colonizationen_HK
dc.subjectBioreceptivityen_HK
dc.subjectBuilding microhabitaten_HK
dc.subjectRuderal vegetationen_HK
dc.subjectSpontaneous vegetationen_HK
dc.subjectUrban biodiversityen_HK
dc.titleBioreceptivity of buildings for spontaneous arboreal flora in compact city environmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY: hragjcy@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, WY: wychen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, WY=rp00589en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ufug.2010.11.001en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79851513304en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195110en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79851513304&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage19en_HK
dc.identifier.epage28en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000289024300004-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, WY=35728317600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10009089-

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