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Article: Is virtual endoscopy of the middle ear useful?

TitleIs virtual endoscopy of the middle ear useful?
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherMedquest Communications, LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.entjournal.com
Citation
Ear, Nose & Throat Journal, 2011, v. 90 n. 6, p. 256-260 How to Cite?
AbstractVirtual endoscopy is a relatively new imaging technology in otology, and therefore data on its efficacy in clinical situations are limited. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the clinical relevance of radiologic diagnoses based on virtual endoscopy of the middle ear. Our patient population was made up of 30 adults who were scheduled to undergo surgery to correct conductive hearing loss of unknown etiology. Virtual endoscopy was performed on three-dimensional images that were constructed from images obtained with conventional two-dimensional computed tomography (CT). Findings on virtual endoscopy were then compared with the subsequent surgical findings. Virtual endoscopy suggested a middle ear pathology in 19 patients and a normal middle ear in 11 patients. Postoperatively, we found that the virtual diagnoses correlated moderately well with the surgical findings in the group of patients with predicted pathology; 13 of these 19 patients were found to have middle ear problems such as ossicular chain anomalies, otosclerosis, and cholesteatoma (positive predictive value: 68%). However, among the 11 patients whose middle ear structures were radiologically predicted to be normal, only 2 had negative middle ear findings on surgical exploration; of the remaining 9 patients, 8 had otosclerosis and 1 had malleus fixation (negative predictive value: 18%). Thus, the sensitivity and specificity of virtual endoscopy were 59 and 25%, respectively. Virtual endoscopy provides images from a surgeon's perspective, and so it has the potential to be useful in the preoperative evaluation of the middle ear cavity. With ongoing advancements in computer systems and imaging techniques, the cost, reliability, and efficacy of virtual endoscopy may improve. However, further clinical validation and cost-benefit analysis are required before we can determine if it has any additional advantages over conventional two-dimensional CT.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139739
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 1.000
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.301
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, ACWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorCo, MTHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChow, CKen_US
dc.contributor.authorAu Yeung, KMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:55:01Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:55:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationEar, Nose & Throat Journal, 2011, v. 90 n. 6, p. 256-260en_US
dc.identifier.issn0145-5613-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139739-
dc.description.abstractVirtual endoscopy is a relatively new imaging technology in otology, and therefore data on its efficacy in clinical situations are limited. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate the clinical relevance of radiologic diagnoses based on virtual endoscopy of the middle ear. Our patient population was made up of 30 adults who were scheduled to undergo surgery to correct conductive hearing loss of unknown etiology. Virtual endoscopy was performed on three-dimensional images that were constructed from images obtained with conventional two-dimensional computed tomography (CT). Findings on virtual endoscopy were then compared with the subsequent surgical findings. Virtual endoscopy suggested a middle ear pathology in 19 patients and a normal middle ear in 11 patients. Postoperatively, we found that the virtual diagnoses correlated moderately well with the surgical findings in the group of patients with predicted pathology; 13 of these 19 patients were found to have middle ear problems such as ossicular chain anomalies, otosclerosis, and cholesteatoma (positive predictive value: 68%). However, among the 11 patients whose middle ear structures were radiologically predicted to be normal, only 2 had negative middle ear findings on surgical exploration; of the remaining 9 patients, 8 had otosclerosis and 1 had malleus fixation (negative predictive value: 18%). Thus, the sensitivity and specificity of virtual endoscopy were 59 and 25%, respectively. Virtual endoscopy provides images from a surgeon's perspective, and so it has the potential to be useful in the preoperative evaluation of the middle ear cavity. With ongoing advancements in computer systems and imaging techniques, the cost, reliability, and efficacy of virtual endoscopy may improve. However, further clinical validation and cost-benefit analysis are required before we can determine if it has any additional advantages over conventional two-dimensional CT.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMedquest Communications, LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.entjournal.com-
dc.relation.ispartofEar, Nose & Throat Journalen_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Computer-Assisted - methods-
dc.subject.meshEar, Middle - pathology - surgery-
dc.subject.meshEndoscopy - instrumentation-
dc.subject.meshHearing Loss, Conductive - diagnosis - pathology - surgery-
dc.subject.meshUser-Computer Interface-
dc.titleIs virtual endoscopy of the middle ear useful?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, ACW: aho1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.pmid21674468-
dc.identifier.hkuros192361en_US
dc.identifier.volume90en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage256en_US
dc.identifier.epage260en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305720900007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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