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Article: Pupil size changes during recognition memory

TitlePupil size changes during recognition memory
Authors
KeywordsCognitive load
False memory
Old/new effect
Pupil size
Pupillometry
Recognition memory
Issue Date2011
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0048-5772
Citation
Psychophysiology, 2011, v. 48 n. 10, p. 1346-1353 How to Cite?
AbstractPupils dilate to a greater extent when participants view old compared to new items during recognition memory tests. We report three experiments investigating the cognitive processes associated with this pupil old/new effect. Using a remember/know procedure, we found that the effect occurred for old items that were both remembered and known at recognition, although it was attenuated for known compared to remembered items. In Experiment 2, the pupil old/new effect was observed when items were presented acoustically, suggesting the effect does not depend on low-level visual processes. The pupil old/new effect was also greater for items encoded under deep compared to shallow orienting instructions, suggesting it may reflect the strength of the underlying memory trace. Finally, the pupil old/new effect was also found when participants falsely recognized items as being old. We propose that pupils respond to a strength-of-memory signal and suggest that pupillometry provides a useful technique for exploring the underlying mechanisms of recognition memory. © 2011 Society for Psychophysiological Research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139699
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.074
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.850
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
ESRCPTA-030-2003-00138
Funding Information:

This research was partly funded by ESRC grant PTA-030-2003-00138 awarded to S.C.O, while S.C.O. and B.S.W. were based at the University of Sussex. Special thanks to Eloise Harris, University of Sussex, for recording audio files and helping with data collection during Experiment 2, and to the students of the University of Sussex for participating in these studies.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOtero, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWeekes, BSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHutton, SBen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:54:29Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:54:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsychophysiology, 2011, v. 48 n. 10, p. 1346-1353en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0048-5772en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139699-
dc.description.abstractPupils dilate to a greater extent when participants view old compared to new items during recognition memory tests. We report three experiments investigating the cognitive processes associated with this pupil old/new effect. Using a remember/know procedure, we found that the effect occurred for old items that were both remembered and known at recognition, although it was attenuated for known compared to remembered items. In Experiment 2, the pupil old/new effect was observed when items were presented acoustically, suggesting the effect does not depend on low-level visual processes. The pupil old/new effect was also greater for items encoded under deep compared to shallow orienting instructions, suggesting it may reflect the strength of the underlying memory trace. Finally, the pupil old/new effect was also found when participants falsely recognized items as being old. We propose that pupils respond to a strength-of-memory signal and suggest that pupillometry provides a useful technique for exploring the underlying mechanisms of recognition memory. © 2011 Society for Psychophysiological Research.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0048-5772en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsychophysiologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.comen_US
dc.subjectCognitive loaden_HK
dc.subjectFalse memoryen_HK
dc.subjectOld/new effecten_HK
dc.subjectPupil sizeen_HK
dc.subjectPupillometryen_HK
dc.subjectRecognition memoryen_HK
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Tests-
dc.subject.meshPupil - physiology-
dc.subject.meshReaction Time - physiology-
dc.subject.meshRecognition (Psychology) - physiology-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.titlePupil size changes during recognition memoryen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWeekes, BS: weekes@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWeekes, BS=rp01390en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1469-8986.2011.01217.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21575007-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959338304en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros194263en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959338304&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume48en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1346en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1353en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295054400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOtero, SC=50262686600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeekes, BS=6701924212en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHutton, SB=7005155421en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9334183-

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