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Article: Potential application of induced pluripotent stem cells in cell replacement therapy for parkinson's disease

TitlePotential application of induced pluripotent stem cells in cell replacement therapy for parkinson's disease
Authors
KeywordsDisease pathology
Disease therapy
Ips cells
Parkinson's disease
Personalized medicine
Issue Date2011
PublisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/cdtcnsnd
Citation
Cns And Neurological Disorders - Drug Targets, 2011, v. 10 n. 4, p. 449-458 How to Cite?
AbstractParkinson's disease (PD), a common degenerative disease in humans, is known to result from loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra and is characterized by severe motor symptoms of tremor, rigidity, bradykinsia and postural instability. Although levodopa administration, surgical neural lesion, and deep brain stimulation have been shown to be effective in improving parkinsonian symptoms, cell replacement therapy such as transplantation of dopamine neurons or neural stem cells has shed new light on an alternative treatment strategy for PD. While the difficulty in securing donor dopamine neurons and the immuno-rejection of neural transplants largely hinder application of neural transplants in clinical treatment, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) derived from somatic cells may represent a powerful tool for studying the pathogenesis of PD and provide a source for replacement therapies in this neurodegenerative disease. Yamanaka et al. [2006, 2007] first succeeded in generating iPS cells by reprogramming fibroblasts with four transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc in both mouse and human. Animal studies have further shown that iPS cells from fibroblasts could be induced into dopamine neurons and transplantation of these cells within the central nervous system improved motor symptoms in the 6-OHDA model of PD. More interestingly, neural stem cells or fibroblasts from patients can be efficiently reprogrammed and subsequently differentiated into dopamine neurons. Derivation of patient-specific iPS cells and subsequent differentiation into dopamine neurons would provide a disease-specific in vitro model for disease pathology, drug screening and personalized stem cell therapy for PD. This review summarizes current methods and modifications in producing iPS cells from somatic cells as well as safety concerns of reprogramming procedures. Novel reprogramming strategies that deter abnormal permanent genetic and epigenetic alterations are essential for propagating clinically-qualified iPS cells. Future investigation into cell transforming and reprogramming processes are needed to generate the disease-specific iPS cells for personalized regeneration medicine of PD patients by disclosing detailed reprogramming mechanisms. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139666
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.188
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.883
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, LWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKuang, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWei, LCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDing, YXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYung, KKLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, YSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:53:13Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:53:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCns And Neurological Disorders - Drug Targets, 2011, v. 10 n. 4, p. 449-458en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1871-5273en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139666-
dc.description.abstractParkinson's disease (PD), a common degenerative disease in humans, is known to result from loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra and is characterized by severe motor symptoms of tremor, rigidity, bradykinsia and postural instability. Although levodopa administration, surgical neural lesion, and deep brain stimulation have been shown to be effective in improving parkinsonian symptoms, cell replacement therapy such as transplantation of dopamine neurons or neural stem cells has shed new light on an alternative treatment strategy for PD. While the difficulty in securing donor dopamine neurons and the immuno-rejection of neural transplants largely hinder application of neural transplants in clinical treatment, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) derived from somatic cells may represent a powerful tool for studying the pathogenesis of PD and provide a source for replacement therapies in this neurodegenerative disease. Yamanaka et al. [2006, 2007] first succeeded in generating iPS cells by reprogramming fibroblasts with four transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc in both mouse and human. Animal studies have further shown that iPS cells from fibroblasts could be induced into dopamine neurons and transplantation of these cells within the central nervous system improved motor symptoms in the 6-OHDA model of PD. More interestingly, neural stem cells or fibroblasts from patients can be efficiently reprogrammed and subsequently differentiated into dopamine neurons. Derivation of patient-specific iPS cells and subsequent differentiation into dopamine neurons would provide a disease-specific in vitro model for disease pathology, drug screening and personalized stem cell therapy for PD. This review summarizes current methods and modifications in producing iPS cells from somatic cells as well as safety concerns of reprogramming procedures. Novel reprogramming strategies that deter abnormal permanent genetic and epigenetic alterations are essential for propagating clinically-qualified iPS cells. Future investigation into cell transforming and reprogramming processes are needed to generate the disease-specific iPS cells for personalized regeneration medicine of PD patients by disclosing detailed reprogramming mechanisms. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBentham Science Publishers Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bentham.org/cdtcnsnden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCNS and Neurological Disorders - Drug Targetsen_HK
dc.subjectDisease pathologyen_HK
dc.subjectDisease therapyen_HK
dc.subjectIps cellsen_HK
dc.subjectParkinson's diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectPersonalized medicineen_HK
dc.titlePotential application of induced pluripotent stem cells in cell replacement therapy for parkinson's diseaseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1871-5273&volume=10&issue=4&spage=449&epage=458&date=2011&atitle=Potential+application+of+induced+pluripotent+stem+cells+in+cell+replacement+therapy+for+Parkinson%27s+diseaseen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, YS: yschan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YS=rp00318en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid21495962-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79956257596en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195178en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79956257596&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume10en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage449en_HK
dc.identifier.epage458en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291634700006-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, LW=25937158100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKuang, F=6602241329en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, LC=7402951429en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDing, YX=36019824800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYung, KKL=13605496000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, YS=7403676627en_HK

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