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Article: Emerging clinical and experimental evidence for the role of lipocalin-2 in metabolic syndrome
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TitleEmerging clinical and experimental evidence for the role of lipocalin-2 in metabolic syndrome
 
AuthorsJang, Y4
Lee, JH3
Wang, Y2
Sweeney, G5 1
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CEP
 
CitationClinical and Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology, 2012, v. 39 n. 2, p. 194-199 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1681.2011.05557.x
 
AbstractThe inflammatory state, which is associated with the current pandemic of obesity, has been established as an important contributing pathogenic factor to the increased prevalence of the so-called metabolic syndrome. Many studies have focused on the contribution of various adipokines to this phenomenon, and in the present study, we provide an update on the emerging evidence that the pro-inflammatory factor, lipocalin-2, might influence various aspects of metabolic syndrome. Previous reports indicate a positive correlation of serum lipocalin-2 with fasting glucose, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, and the inflammatory marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, even after adjustment for body mass index, suggesting that it is an independent risk factor for insulin resistance, diabetes, and inflammation. Direct analysis of lipocalin-2 action now also shows effects on peripheral metabolism and on cardiovascular function. A better understanding of how lipocalin-2 is regulated locally and systemically is crucial for adding to our understanding of the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, and to uncover potential new avenues for therapeutic approaches.
 
ISSN0305-1870
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1681.2011.05557.x
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorJang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, JH
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorSweeney, G
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:52:28Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:52:28Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractThe inflammatory state, which is associated with the current pandemic of obesity, has been established as an important contributing pathogenic factor to the increased prevalence of the so-called metabolic syndrome. Many studies have focused on the contribution of various adipokines to this phenomenon, and in the present study, we provide an update on the emerging evidence that the pro-inflammatory factor, lipocalin-2, might influence various aspects of metabolic syndrome. Previous reports indicate a positive correlation of serum lipocalin-2 with fasting glucose, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, and the inflammatory marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, even after adjustment for body mass index, suggesting that it is an independent risk factor for insulin resistance, diabetes, and inflammation. Direct analysis of lipocalin-2 action now also shows effects on peripheral metabolism and on cardiovascular function. A better understanding of how lipocalin-2 is regulated locally and systemically is crucial for adding to our understanding of the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, and to uncover potential new avenues for therapeutic approaches.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationClinical and Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology, 2012, v. 39 n. 2, p. 194-199 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1681.2011.05557.x
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1681.2011.05557.x
 
dc.identifier.epage199
 
dc.identifier.hkuros195689
 
dc.identifier.hkuros219905
 
dc.identifier.issn0305-1870
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid21689137
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863030946
 
dc.identifier.spage194
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139606
 
dc.identifier.volume39
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CEP
 
dc.publisher.placeAustralia
 
dc.relation.ispartofClinical and Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology
 
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
 
dc.subject.meshAcute-Phase Proteins - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshLipocalins - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X - metabolism - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshObesity - metabolism - therapy
 
dc.subject.meshProto-Oncogene Proteins - physiology
 
dc.titleEmerging clinical and experimental evidence for the role of lipocalin-2 in metabolic syndrome
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. York University
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Yonsei University
  4. Yonsei University College of Medicine
  5. Institut Pasteur Korea