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Article: Endothelial dysfunction: A strategic target in the treatment of hypertension?

TitleEndothelial dysfunction: A strategic target in the treatment of hypertension?
Authors
KeywordsContraction
Endothelium
Free radical
Hypertensive rats
Prostaglandin
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00424/index.htm
Citation
Pflugers Archiv European Journal Of Physiology, 2010, v. 459 n. 6, p. 995-1004 How to Cite?
AbstractEndothelial dysfunction is a common feature of hypertension, and it results from the imbalanced release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors (EDRFs; in particular, nitric oxide) and endothelium-derived contracting factors (EDCFs; angiotensin II, endothelins, uridine adenosine tetraphosphate, and cyclooxygenase-derived EDCFs). Thus, drugs that increase EDRFs (using direct nitric oxide releasing compounds, tetrahydrobiopterin, or l-arginine supplementation) or decrease EDCF release or actions (using cyclooxygenase inhibitor or thromboxane A2/prostanoid receptor antagonists) would prevent the dysfunction. Many conventional antihypertensive drugs, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and third-generation β-blockers, possess the ability to reverse endothelial dysfunction. Their use is attractive, as they can address arterial blood pressure and vascular tone simultaneously. The severity of endothelial dysfunction correlates with the development of coronary artery disease and predicts future cardiovascular events. Thus, endothelial dysfunction needs to be considered as a strategic target in the treatment of hypertension. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139591
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.654
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.638
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, EHCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:52:19Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:52:19Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPflugers Archiv European Journal Of Physiology, 2010, v. 459 n. 6, p. 995-1004en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-6768en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139591-
dc.description.abstractEndothelial dysfunction is a common feature of hypertension, and it results from the imbalanced release of endothelium-derived relaxing factors (EDRFs; in particular, nitric oxide) and endothelium-derived contracting factors (EDCFs; angiotensin II, endothelins, uridine adenosine tetraphosphate, and cyclooxygenase-derived EDCFs). Thus, drugs that increase EDRFs (using direct nitric oxide releasing compounds, tetrahydrobiopterin, or l-arginine supplementation) or decrease EDCF release or actions (using cyclooxygenase inhibitor or thromboxane A2/prostanoid receptor antagonists) would prevent the dysfunction. Many conventional antihypertensive drugs, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and third-generation β-blockers, possess the ability to reverse endothelial dysfunction. Their use is attractive, as they can address arterial blood pressure and vascular tone simultaneously. The severity of endothelial dysfunction correlates with the development of coronary artery disease and predicts future cardiovascular events. Thus, endothelial dysfunction needs to be considered as a strategic target in the treatment of hypertension. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00424/index.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectContractionen_HK
dc.subjectEndotheliumen_HK
dc.subjectFree radicalen_HK
dc.subjectHypertensive ratsen_HK
dc.subjectProstaglandinen_HK
dc.subject.meshAntihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshEndothelium, Vascular - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshHypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshProstaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshReactive Oxygen Species - metabolism-
dc.titleEndothelial dysfunction: A strategic target in the treatment of hypertension?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTang, EHC: evatang1@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PM: vanhoutt@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTang, EHC=rp01382en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PM=rp00238en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00424-010-0786-4en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20127126-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77952891127en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros192141en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77952891127&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume459en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage995en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1004en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1432-2013-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000277376200019-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, EHC=9536518500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanhoutte, PM=7202304247en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6803434-

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