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Article: Functional magnetic resonance imaging activation of the brain in children: Real acupoint versus sham acupoint
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TitleFunctional magnetic resonance imaging activation of the brain in children: Real acupoint versus sham acupoint
 
AuthorsWu, Y4 3
Jin, Z2
Li, K2
Lu, ZL4
Wong, V4
Han, TL4
Zheng, H4
Caspi, O1
Liu, G2
Zeng, YW2
Zou, LP4 3
 
Keywordsacupuncture
children
functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
real acupoint (Liv3)
sham acupoint
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcn.sagepub.com
 
CitationJournal Of Child Neurology, 2010, v. 25 n. 7, p. 849-855 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073809351314
 
AbstractThe purpose was to examine the brain activation patterns with acupuncture using real acupoint (Liv3) versus sham acupoint in healthy, sedated children using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Functional magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain for 10 healthy, sedated children were taken during stimulation of real acupoint (Liv3 [Taichong]) and a nearby sham acupoint in a randomized order, employing twisting and nontwisting methods using a blocked paradigm using a 2.0-T scanner. The functional data were analyzed by using SPM 99. Various regions of the brain were activated in 2 acupoints. However, the pattern was different for the 2 acupoints. We suggest specific cerebral activation patterns with acupuncture might explain some of its therapeutic effect. © The Author(s) 2010.
 
DescriptionComment in J Child Neurol. 2011 Feb;26(2):261-262; author reply 262
 
ISSN0883-0738
2013 Impact Factor: 1.666
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073809351314
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000279409100007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
International Science and Technology Cooperation Foundation of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China2008DFA31850
International Cooperation of Science and Technique Foundation of Beijing2007G05
Beijing Chinese medicine projectsJJ2005-17
Funding Information:

The authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research and/or authorship of this article: This research project was sponsored by the International Science and Technology Cooperation Foundation of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (No. 2008DFA31850), the International Cooperation of Science and Technique Foundation of Beijing (2007G05), and the Beijing Chinese medicine projects (Grant no. JJ2005-17).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWu, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorJin, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, K
 
dc.contributor.authorLu, ZL
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, V
 
dc.contributor.authorHan, TL
 
dc.contributor.authorZheng, H
 
dc.contributor.authorCaspi, O
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, G
 
dc.contributor.authorZeng, YW
 
dc.contributor.authorZou, LP
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:52:08Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:52:08Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractThe purpose was to examine the brain activation patterns with acupuncture using real acupoint (Liv3) versus sham acupoint in healthy, sedated children using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Functional magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain for 10 healthy, sedated children were taken during stimulation of real acupoint (Liv3 [Taichong]) and a nearby sham acupoint in a randomized order, employing twisting and nontwisting methods using a blocked paradigm using a 2.0-T scanner. The functional data were analyzed by using SPM 99. Various regions of the brain were activated in 2 acupoints. However, the pattern was different for the 2 acupoints. We suggest specific cerebral activation patterns with acupuncture might explain some of its therapeutic effect. © The Author(s) 2010.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.descriptionComment in J Child Neurol. 2011 Feb;26(2):261-262; author reply 262
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Child Neurology, 2010, v. 25 n. 7, p. 849-855 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073809351314
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073809351314
 
dc.identifier.epage855
 
dc.identifier.hkuros173927
 
dc.identifier.hkuros196001
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000279409100007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
International Science and Technology Cooperation Foundation of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China2008DFA31850
International Cooperation of Science and Technique Foundation of Beijing2007G05
Beijing Chinese medicine projectsJJ2005-17
Funding Information:

The authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research and/or authorship of this article: This research project was sponsored by the International Science and Technology Cooperation Foundation of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (No. 2008DFA31850), the International Cooperation of Science and Technique Foundation of Beijing (2007G05), and the Beijing Chinese medicine projects (Grant no. JJ2005-17).

 
dc.identifier.issn0883-0738
2013 Impact Factor: 1.666
 
dc.identifier.issue7
 
dc.identifier.pmid20595697
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954421518
 
dc.identifier.spage849
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139586
 
dc.identifier.volume25
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcn.sagepub.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Child Neurology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Child Neurology. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc..
 
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Points
 
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapy - methods
 
dc.subject.meshBrain - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshConscious Sedation
 
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging
 
dc.subjectacupuncture
 
dc.subjectchildren
 
dc.subjectfunctional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
 
dc.subjectreal acupoint (Liv3)
 
dc.subjectsham acupoint
 
dc.titleFunctional magnetic resonance imaging activation of the brain in children: Real acupoint versus sham acupoint
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Jin, Z</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, K</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lu, ZL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, V</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Han, TL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zheng, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Caspi, O</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Liu, G</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zeng, YW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zou, LP</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>The purpose was to examine the brain activation patterns with acupuncture using real acupoint (Liv3) versus sham acupoint in healthy, sedated children using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Functional magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain for 10 healthy, sedated children were taken during stimulation of real acupoint (Liv3 [Taichong]) and a nearby sham acupoint in a randomized order, employing twisting and nontwisting methods using a blocked paradigm using a 2.0-T scanner. The functional data were analyzed by using SPM 99. Various regions of the brain were activated in 2 acupoints. However, the pattern was different for the 2 acupoints. We suggest specific cerebral activation patterns with acupuncture might explain some of its therapeutic effect. &#169; The Author(s) 2010.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. 306th Hospital of the People's Liberation Army
  3. General Hospital of People's Liberation Army
  4. Capital Medical University China