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Article: Successive influenza virus infection and Streptococcus pneumoniae stimulation alter human dendritic cell function

TitleSuccessive influenza virus infection and Streptococcus pneumoniae stimulation alter human dendritic cell function
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/
Citation
Bmc Infectious Diseases, 2011, v. 11 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Influenza virus is a major cause of respiratory disease worldwide and Streptococcus pneumoniae infection associated with influenza often leads to severe complications. Dendritic cells are key antigen presenting cells but its role in such co-infection is unclear.Methods: In this study, human monocyte derived-dentritic cells were either concurrently or successively challenged with the combination of live influenza virus and heat killed pneumococcus to mimic the viral pneumococcal infection. Dendritic cell viability, phenotypic maturation and cytokine production were then examined.Results: The challenge of influenza virus and pneumococcus altered dendritic cell functions dependent on the time interval between the successive challenge of influenza virus and pneumococcus, as well as the doses of pneumococcus. When dendritic cells were exposed to pneumococcus at 6 hr, but not 0 hr nor 24 hr after influenza virus infection, both virus and pneumococcus treated dendritic cells had greater cell apoptosis and expressed higher CD83 and CD86 than dendritic cells infected with influenza virus alone. Dendritic cells produced pro-inflammatory cytokines: TNF-α, IL-12 and IFN-γ synergistically to the successive viral and pneumococcal challenge. Whereas prior influenza virus infection suppressed the IL-10 response independent of the timing of the subsequent pneumococcal stimulation.Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that successive challenge of dendritic cells with influenza virus and pneumococcus resulted in synergistic up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines with simultaneous down-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine, which may explain the immuno-pathogenesis of this important co-infection. © 2011 Wu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139573
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.69
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.510
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong SAR, ChinaAoE/M-12/06
Research Grants Council of Hong KongHKU 777108M
HKU777407
HKU768108
Health, Welfare and Food Bureau of the Hong Kong SAR GovernmentLab-11
Edward Sai-Kim Hotung Paediatric Education and Research Fund
Funding Information:

This work was supported in part by the Area of Excellence program on Influenza supported by the University Grants Committee of the Hong Kong SAR, China (Project No AoE/M-12/06); General Research Fund, Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, (HKU 777108M, HKU777407, HKU768108); a Commission Grant from the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Diseases (RFCID) of the Health, Welfare and Food Bureau of the Hong Kong SAR Government (2009-2014, Lab-11); Edward Sai-Kim Hotung Paediatric Education and Research Fund. Technical support of the use of flow cytometry from Faculty Core Facility.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMao, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLing, MTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, PLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTu, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:51:54Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:51:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBmc Infectious Diseases, 2011, v. 11en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1471-2334en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139573-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Influenza virus is a major cause of respiratory disease worldwide and Streptococcus pneumoniae infection associated with influenza often leads to severe complications. Dendritic cells are key antigen presenting cells but its role in such co-infection is unclear.Methods: In this study, human monocyte derived-dentritic cells were either concurrently or successively challenged with the combination of live influenza virus and heat killed pneumococcus to mimic the viral pneumococcal infection. Dendritic cell viability, phenotypic maturation and cytokine production were then examined.Results: The challenge of influenza virus and pneumococcus altered dendritic cell functions dependent on the time interval between the successive challenge of influenza virus and pneumococcus, as well as the doses of pneumococcus. When dendritic cells were exposed to pneumococcus at 6 hr, but not 0 hr nor 24 hr after influenza virus infection, both virus and pneumococcus treated dendritic cells had greater cell apoptosis and expressed higher CD83 and CD86 than dendritic cells infected with influenza virus alone. Dendritic cells produced pro-inflammatory cytokines: TNF-α, IL-12 and IFN-γ synergistically to the successive viral and pneumococcal challenge. Whereas prior influenza virus infection suppressed the IL-10 response independent of the timing of the subsequent pneumococcal stimulation.Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that successive challenge of dendritic cells with influenza virus and pneumococcus resulted in synergistic up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines with simultaneous down-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine, which may explain the immuno-pathogenesis of this important co-infection. © 2011 Wu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Infectious Diseasesen_HK
dc.rightsBMC Infectious Diseases. Copyright © BioMed Central.-
dc.subject.meshDendritic Cells - immunology - microbiology - virology-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - immunology-
dc.subject.meshPneumococcal Infections - immunology-
dc.subject.meshStreptococcus pneumoniae - immunology-
dc.titleSuccessive influenza virus infection and Streptococcus pneumoniae stimulation alter human dendritic cell functionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMao, H:hwmau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChow, KH:khchowb@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL:plho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTu, W:wwtu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL:lauylung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMao, H=rp01595en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChow, KH=rp00370en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTu, W=rp00416en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2334-11-201en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21771345-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3146832-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960556668en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros192241en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros200730en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960556668&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293283200001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza-
dc.relation.projectThe Role of Natural Killer Cells in the Pathogenesis of Avian Influenza Virus Infection-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, Y=44761666500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMao, H=25632489000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLing, MT=44761279100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChow, KH=7202180736en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, PL=7402211363en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTu, W=7006479236en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, YL=7201403380en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9573224-

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