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Article: Advance directive and end-of-life care preferences among Chinese nursing home residents in Hong Kong
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TitleAdvance directive and end-of-life care preferences among Chinese nursing home residents in Hong Kong
 
AuthorsChu, LW5 4 1
Luk, JKH5
Hui, E3
Chiu, PKC5 4
Chan, CSY1
Kwan, SM
Kwok, T2
Lee, D6
Woo, J2
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jmda
 
CitationJournal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2011, v. 12 n. 2, p. 143-152 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2010.08.015
 
AbstractOBJECTIVES: The objectives of the present study were to describe the knowledge and preferences of Hong Kong Chinese older adults regarding advance directives and end-of-life care decisions, and to investigate the predictors of preferences for advance directive and community end-of-life care in nursing homes. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in 140 nursing homes in Hong Kong. A total of 1600 cognitively normal Chinese older adults were recruited. Information on demographics, social, medical diseases, preferences of end-of-life care decisions, and advance directives were collected by face-to-face questionnaire interviews. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 82.4 years; 94.2% of them would prefer to be informed of the diagnosis if they had terminal diseases and 88.0% preferred to have their advance directives regarding medical treatment in the future. Approximately 35% would prefer to die in their nursing homes. The significant independent predictors for the preference of advance directive included asking for relatives' advice, wishing to be informed of their terminal illness diagnoses, absence of stroke, and having no problems in self-care in European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions. For the preference for community end-of-life care and dying in nursing homes, the independent predictors included older age, not having siblings in Hong Kong, Catholic religion, nonbeliever of traditional Chinese religion, not receiving any old age allowance, lower Geriatric Depression Scale score, and being residents of government-subsidized nursing homes. CONCLUSIONS: Most of our cognitively normal Chinese nursing home older adults prefer having an advance directive, and one-third of them would prefer to die in nursing homes.
 
ISSN1525-8610
2012 Impact Factor: 5.302
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.841
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2010.08.015
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000287331500012
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR GovernmentSHS-E-08
Funding Information:

This study was funded by a research grant from Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR Government (SHS-E-08).

 
GrantsAdvance directive and the preference of old age home residents for community model of end-of-life care in the Hong Kong
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChu, LW
 
dc.contributor.authorLuk, JKH
 
dc.contributor.authorHui, E
 
dc.contributor.authorChiu, PKC
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, CSY
 
dc.contributor.authorKwan, SM
 
dc.contributor.authorKwok, T
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, D
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, J
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:50:25Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:50:25Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The objectives of the present study were to describe the knowledge and preferences of Hong Kong Chinese older adults regarding advance directives and end-of-life care decisions, and to investigate the predictors of preferences for advance directive and community end-of-life care in nursing homes. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in 140 nursing homes in Hong Kong. A total of 1600 cognitively normal Chinese older adults were recruited. Information on demographics, social, medical diseases, preferences of end-of-life care decisions, and advance directives were collected by face-to-face questionnaire interviews. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 82.4 years; 94.2% of them would prefer to be informed of the diagnosis if they had terminal diseases and 88.0% preferred to have their advance directives regarding medical treatment in the future. Approximately 35% would prefer to die in their nursing homes. The significant independent predictors for the preference of advance directive included asking for relatives' advice, wishing to be informed of their terminal illness diagnoses, absence of stroke, and having no problems in self-care in European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions. For the preference for community end-of-life care and dying in nursing homes, the independent predictors included older age, not having siblings in Hong Kong, Catholic religion, nonbeliever of traditional Chinese religion, not receiving any old age allowance, lower Geriatric Depression Scale score, and being residents of government-subsidized nursing homes. CONCLUSIONS: Most of our cognitively normal Chinese nursing home older adults prefer having an advance directive, and one-third of them would prefer to die in nursing homes.
 
dc.description.naturepostprint
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2011, v. 12 n. 2, p. 143-152 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2010.08.015
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2010.08.015
 
dc.identifier.epage152
 
dc.identifier.hkuros194551
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287331500012
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR GovernmentSHS-E-08
Funding Information:

This study was funded by a research grant from Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR Government (SHS-E-08).

 
dc.identifier.issn1525-8610
2012 Impact Factor: 5.302
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.841
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid21266291
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78751706337
 
dc.identifier.spage143
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139467
 
dc.identifier.volume12
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jmda
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
 
dc.relation.projectAdvance directive and the preference of old age home residents for community model of end-of-life care in the Hong Kong
 
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 2011, v. 12 n. 2, p. 143-152. DOI: 10.1016/j.jamda.2010.08.015
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAdvance Directives
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong
 
dc.subject.meshNursing Homes
 
dc.subject.meshPatient Preference
 
dc.subject.meshTerminal Care
 
dc.titleAdvance directive and end-of-life care preferences among Chinese nursing home residents in Hong Kong
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<item><contributor.author>Chu, LW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Luk, JKH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hui, E</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chiu, PKC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, CSY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kwan, SM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kwok, T</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lee, D</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Woo, J</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the present study were to describe the knowledge and preferences of Hong Kong Chinese older adults regarding advance directives and end-of-life care decisions, and to investigate the predictors of preferences for advance directive and community end-of-life care in nursing homes. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in 140 nursing homes in Hong Kong. A total of 1600 cognitively normal Chinese older adults were recruited. Information on demographics, social, medical diseases, preferences of end-of-life care decisions, and advance directives were collected by face-to-face questionnaire interviews. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 82.4 years; 94.2% of them would prefer to be informed of the diagnosis if they had terminal diseases and 88.0% preferred to have their advance directives regarding medical treatment in the future. Approximately 35% would prefer to die in their nursing homes. The significant independent predictors for the preference of advance directive included asking for relatives&apos; advice, wishing to be informed of their terminal illness diagnoses, absence of stroke, and having no problems in self-care in European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions. For the preference for community end-of-life care and dying in nursing homes, the independent predictors included older age, not having siblings in Hong Kong, Catholic religion, nonbeliever of traditional Chinese religion, not receiving any old age allowance, lower Geriatric Depression Scale score, and being residents of government-subsidized nursing homes. CONCLUSIONS: Most of our cognitively normal Chinese nursing home older adults prefer having an advance directive, and one-third of them would prefer to die in nursing homes.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Prince of Wales Hospital Hong Kong
  3. Shatin Hospital
  4. Grantham Hospital Hong Kong
  5. Fung Yiu King Hospital
  6. Chinese University of Hong Kong