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Article: Association between alcohol consumption and cognitive impairment in Southern Chinese older adults

TitleAssociation between alcohol consumption and cognitive impairment in Southern Chinese older adults
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294
Citation
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2010, v. 25 n. 12, p. 1272-1279 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: There is limited data on the effects of alcohol consumption on cognitive impairment in Chinese populations. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of cognitive impairment in Southern Chinese older adults in Hong Kong. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study of 314 Chinese older participants, aged 65 years or over. Participants' socio-demographic, co-morbid diseases, alcohol drinking habits, and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) for cognitive function were obtained by a face-to-face interview. Participants were categorized into normal cognitive and cognitively impaired groups by education-adjusted MMSE cut-off scores. RESULT: The mean (SD) age of the participants was 79.9 (6.5) years. The average weekly alcohol consumption in the cognitively impaired group was significantly higher than that of the normal cognition group [mean (SD): 861.89 (673.03) versus 241.21 (276.26) grams per week respectively; p < 0.001, t-test]. Drinkers with light to moderate alcohol consumption were associated with higher MMSE scores than non-drinkers and heavy drinkers. Logistic regression analyses showed that heavy drinkers (> 400 g alcohol for men and > 280 g for women) were associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment (OR = 4.99, 95%CI = 1.8-13.82), while light drinkers and moderated drinkers (< 400 g for men and < 280 g for women) were associated with reduced risks (OR = 0.32, 95%CI = 0.12-0.86; OR = 0.17, 95%CI = 0.06-0.51, respectively). Exercise and age were independent protective and risk factors respectively. CONCLUSION: Heavy alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment while light to moderate alcohol consumption is associated with reduced risk among Southern Chinese older adults in Hong Kong. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139465
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.699
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.382
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
HKU Alzheimer's Disease Research Network, SRT Healthy Ageing, the University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study partly fulfilled the requirement for the degree of Master of Medical Sciences of Mr King Chan in the University of Hong Kong. Dr L.W. Chu is partially supported by the HKU Alzheimer's Disease Research Network, SRT Healthy Ageing, the University of Hong Kong.

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChiu, KCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, LWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:50:22Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:50:22Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2010, v. 25 n. 12, p. 1272-1279en_US
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139465-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: There is limited data on the effects of alcohol consumption on cognitive impairment in Chinese populations. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of cognitive impairment in Southern Chinese older adults in Hong Kong. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study of 314 Chinese older participants, aged 65 years or over. Participants' socio-demographic, co-morbid diseases, alcohol drinking habits, and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) for cognitive function were obtained by a face-to-face interview. Participants were categorized into normal cognitive and cognitively impaired groups by education-adjusted MMSE cut-off scores. RESULT: The mean (SD) age of the participants was 79.9 (6.5) years. The average weekly alcohol consumption in the cognitively impaired group was significantly higher than that of the normal cognition group [mean (SD): 861.89 (673.03) versus 241.21 (276.26) grams per week respectively; p < 0.001, t-test]. Drinkers with light to moderate alcohol consumption were associated with higher MMSE scores than non-drinkers and heavy drinkers. Logistic regression analyses showed that heavy drinkers (> 400 g alcohol for men and > 280 g for women) were associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment (OR = 4.99, 95%CI = 1.8-13.82), while light drinkers and moderated drinkers (< 400 g for men and < 280 g for women) were associated with reduced risks (OR = 0.32, 95%CI = 0.12-0.86; OR = 0.17, 95%CI = 0.06-0.51, respectively). Exercise and age were independent protective and risk factors respectively. CONCLUSION: Heavy alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment while light to moderate alcohol consumption is associated with reduced risk among Southern Chinese older adults in Hong Kong. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatryen_US
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshAlcohol Drinking - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshBrief Psychiatric Rating Scale-
dc.subject.meshCognition Disorders - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiology-
dc.titleAssociation between alcohol consumption and cognitive impairment in Southern Chinese older adultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChu, LW: lwchu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/gps.2470-
dc.identifier.pmid21086537-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649648379-
dc.identifier.hkuros194548en_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage1272en_US
dc.identifier.epage1279en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285261900010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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