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Article: Nano-scale structure and mechanical properties of the human dentine-enamel junction
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TitleNano-scale structure and mechanical properties of the human dentine-enamel junction
 
AuthorsChan, YL1
Ngan, AHW1
King, NM1
 
KeywordsBiomineralization
Dentine-enamel junction
Nanomechanical testing
Transmission electron microscope
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/711005/description#description
 
CitationJournal Of The Mechanical Behavior Of Biomedical Materials, 2011, v. 4 n. 5, p. 785-795 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2010.09.003
 
AbstractDespite being an interface between two mechanically mismatched phases of the soft dentine and hard enamel, the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ) in a human tooth is in general capable of withstanding a long working life of repeated dynamic loading. The current poor understanding of the structure and properties of the DEJ has presented a major obstacle to designing better therapeutic protocols for complications concerning the DEJ. In this investigation, it was discovered that the DEJ is a thin, but gradual interface with characteristics transiting from those of dentine to those of enamel. The collagen fibres in dentine enter into the enamel side of the DEJ and terminate in a region in which the hydroxyapatite crystals begin to show enamel characteristics. Using focused ion beam machining, micro-beams were fabricated from regions within 50 μm of the DEJ and were subjected to bend tests. In spite of the similarity in the flexural strength of the DEJ and enamel, fractographs revealed cracks in the DEJ that propagated along structures with dentine characteristics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the testing of the mechanical properties of the DEJ. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
 
ISSN1751-6161
2012 Impact Factor: 2.368
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.780
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2010.09.003
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000291914800015
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChan, YL
 
dc.contributor.authorNgan, AHW
 
dc.contributor.authorKing, NM
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:48:50Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:48:50Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractDespite being an interface between two mechanically mismatched phases of the soft dentine and hard enamel, the dentine-enamel junction (DEJ) in a human tooth is in general capable of withstanding a long working life of repeated dynamic loading. The current poor understanding of the structure and properties of the DEJ has presented a major obstacle to designing better therapeutic protocols for complications concerning the DEJ. In this investigation, it was discovered that the DEJ is a thin, but gradual interface with characteristics transiting from those of dentine to those of enamel. The collagen fibres in dentine enter into the enamel side of the DEJ and terminate in a region in which the hydroxyapatite crystals begin to show enamel characteristics. Using focused ion beam machining, micro-beams were fabricated from regions within 50 μm of the DEJ and were subjected to bend tests. In spite of the similarity in the flexural strength of the DEJ and enamel, fractographs revealed cracks in the DEJ that propagated along structures with dentine characteristics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the testing of the mechanical properties of the DEJ. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The Mechanical Behavior Of Biomedical Materials, 2011, v. 4 n. 5, p. 785-795 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2010.09.003
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2010.09.003
 
dc.identifier.epage795
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192469
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291914800015
 
dc.identifier.issn1751-6161
2012 Impact Factor: 2.368
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.780
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid21565726
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79955729028
 
dc.identifier.spage785
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139361
 
dc.identifier.volume4
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/711005/description#description
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshBiomechanics
 
dc.subject.meshDental Enamel - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshDentin - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshElastic Modulus
 
dc.subject.meshHardness
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMaterials Testing
 
dc.subject.meshMechanical Processes
 
dc.subject.meshNanostructures - chemistry
 
dc.subjectBiomineralization
 
dc.subjectDentine-enamel junction
 
dc.subjectNanomechanical testing
 
dc.subjectTransmission electron microscope
 
dc.titleNano-scale structure and mechanical properties of the human dentine-enamel junction
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong