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Article: Ventilation rates and health: multidisciplinary review of the scientific literature

TitleVentilation rates and health: multidisciplinary review of the scientific literature
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/INA
Citation
Indoor Air, 2011, v. 21 n. 3, p. 191-204 How to Cite?
Abstract
The scientific literature through 2005 on the effects of ventilation rates on health in indoor environments has been reviewed by a multidisciplinary group. The group judged 27 papers published in peer-reviewed scientific journals as providing sufficient information on both ventilation rates and health effects to inform the relationship. Consistency was found across multiple investigations and different epidemiologic designs for different populations. Multiple health endpoints show similar relationships with ventilation rate. There is biological plausibility for an association of health outcomes with ventilation rates, although the literature does not provide clear evidence on particular agent(s) for the effects. Higher ventilation rates in offices, up to about 25 l/s per person, are associated with reduced prevalence of sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms. The limited available data suggest that inflammation, respiratory infections, asthma symptoms and short-term sick leave increase with lower ventilation rates. Home ventilation rates above 0.5 air changes per hour (h(-1)) have been associated with a reduced risk of allergic manifestations among children in a Nordic climate. The need remains for more studies of the relationship between ventilation rates and health, especially in diverse climates, in locations with polluted outdoor air and in buildings other than offices. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Ventilation with outdoor air plays an important role influencing human exposures to indoor pollutants. This review and assessment indicates that increasing ventilation rates above currently adopted standards and guidelines should result in reduced prevalence of negative health outcomes. Building operators and designers should avoid low ventilation rates unless alternative effective measures, such as source control or air cleaning, are employed to limit indoor pollutant levels.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139360
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 4.202
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)
National Center for Energy Management and Building Technology (NCEMBT)
Funding Information:

The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Gina Bendy and Shela Ray of the Indoor Air Institute, Inc., for their assistance in the literature review. Funding was provided by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) and the National Center for Energy Management and Building Technology (NCEMBT). The Indoor Air Institute was the project contractor.

 

Author Affiliations
  1. Danmarks Tekniske Universitet
  2. Harvard School of Public Health
  3. The University of Hong Kong
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  5. University of Southern California
  6. Wythenshawe Hospital
  7. Bispebjerg Hospital
  8. Taylor Engineers
  9. UC Berkeley
  10. University of California, San Diego
  11. UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
  12. Tsinghua University
  13. National Institute of Standards and Technology
  14. Building Ecology Research Group
  15. University of Minnesota System
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSundell, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLevin, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorNazaroff, WWen_US
dc.contributor.authorCain, WSen_US
dc.contributor.authorFisk, WJen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrimsrud, DTen_US
dc.contributor.authorGyntelberg, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorPersily, AKen_US
dc.contributor.authorPickering, ACen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamet, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpengler, JDen_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, STen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeschler, CJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:48:49Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:48:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationIndoor Air, 2011, v. 21 n. 3, p. 191-204en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-6947-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139360-
dc.description.abstractThe scientific literature through 2005 on the effects of ventilation rates on health in indoor environments has been reviewed by a multidisciplinary group. The group judged 27 papers published in peer-reviewed scientific journals as providing sufficient information on both ventilation rates and health effects to inform the relationship. Consistency was found across multiple investigations and different epidemiologic designs for different populations. Multiple health endpoints show similar relationships with ventilation rate. There is biological plausibility for an association of health outcomes with ventilation rates, although the literature does not provide clear evidence on particular agent(s) for the effects. Higher ventilation rates in offices, up to about 25 l/s per person, are associated with reduced prevalence of sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms. The limited available data suggest that inflammation, respiratory infections, asthma symptoms and short-term sick leave increase with lower ventilation rates. Home ventilation rates above 0.5 air changes per hour (h(-1)) have been associated with a reduced risk of allergic manifestations among children in a Nordic climate. The need remains for more studies of the relationship between ventilation rates and health, especially in diverse climates, in locations with polluted outdoor air and in buildings other than offices. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Ventilation with outdoor air plays an important role influencing human exposures to indoor pollutants. This review and assessment indicates that increasing ventilation rates above currently adopted standards and guidelines should result in reduced prevalence of negative health outcomes. Building operators and designers should avoid low ventilation rates unless alternative effective measures, such as source control or air cleaning, are employed to limit indoor pollutant levels.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/INA-
dc.relation.ispartofIndoor Airen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshHousing-
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshSick Building Syndrome - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshVentilation - statistics and numerical data-
dc.titleVentilation rates and health: multidisciplinary review of the scientific literatureen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y: liyg@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0668.2010.00703.x-
dc.identifier.pmid21204989-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79956024495-
dc.identifier.hkuros192422en_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage191en_US
dc.identifier.epage204en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290490300004-
dc.publisher.placeDenmark-
dc.identifier.citeulike9322388-

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