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Article: Role of two-way airflow owing to temperature difference in severe acute respiratory syndrome transmission: Revisiting the largest nosocomial severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in Hong Kong

TitleRole of two-way airflow owing to temperature difference in severe acute respiratory syndrome transmission: Revisiting the largest nosocomial severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://publishing.royalsociety.org/index.cfm?page=1572
Citation
Journal Of The Royal Society Interface, 2011, v. 8 n. 58, p. 699-710 How to Cite?
AbstractBy revisiting the air distribution and bioaerosol dispersion in Ward 8A where the largest nosocomial severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak occurred in Hong Kong in 2003, we found an interesting phenomenon. Although all the cubicles were in 'positive pressure' towards the corridor, the virus-containing bioaerosols generated from the index patient's cubicle were still transmitted to other cubicles, which cannot be explained in a traditional manner. A multi-zone model combining the two-way airflow effect was used to analyse this phenomenon. The multi-zone airflow model was evaluated by our experimental data. Comparing with the previous computational fluid dynamic simulation results, we found that the air exchange owing to the small temperature differences between cubicles played a major role in SARS transmission. Additionally, the validated multi-zone model combining the two-way airflow effect could simulate the pollutant transport with reasonable accuracy but much less computational time. A probable improvement in general ward design was also proposed. © 2010 The Royal Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139358
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.818
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.622
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Natural Science Foundation of China51078216
Tsinghua University Initiative
Funding Information:

This study was sponsored by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant no. 51078216) and supported by Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Programme.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:48:46Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:48:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The Royal Society Interface, 2011, v. 8 n. 58, p. 699-710en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1742-5689en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139358-
dc.description.abstractBy revisiting the air distribution and bioaerosol dispersion in Ward 8A where the largest nosocomial severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak occurred in Hong Kong in 2003, we found an interesting phenomenon. Although all the cubicles were in 'positive pressure' towards the corridor, the virus-containing bioaerosols generated from the index patient's cubicle were still transmitted to other cubicles, which cannot be explained in a traditional manner. A multi-zone model combining the two-way airflow effect was used to analyse this phenomenon. The multi-zone airflow model was evaluated by our experimental data. Comparing with the previous computational fluid dynamic simulation results, we found that the air exchange owing to the small temperature differences between cubicles played a major role in SARS transmission. Additionally, the validated multi-zone model combining the two-way airflow effect could simulate the pollutant transport with reasonable accuracy but much less computational time. A probable improvement in general ward design was also proposed. © 2010 The Royal Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://publishing.royalsociety.org/index.cfm?page=1572en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Royal Society Interfaceen_HK
dc.subject.meshAerosolsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Movementsen_HK
dc.subject.meshComputer Simulationen_HK
dc.subject.meshCross Infection - diagnosis - transmissionen_HK
dc.subject.meshData Interpretation, Statisticalen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen_HK
dc.subject.meshFacility Design and Constructionen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHospitalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshModels, Statisticalen_HK
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - diagnosis - transmissionen_HK
dc.subject.meshTemperatureen_HK
dc.subject.meshVentilationen_HK
dc.titleRole of two-way airflow owing to temperature difference in severe acute respiratory syndrome transmission: Revisiting the largest nosocomial severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:liyg@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsif.2010.0486en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21068029-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3061095-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953238109en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros192420en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros209912-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79953238109&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume8en_HK
dc.identifier.issue58en_HK
dc.identifier.spage699en_HK
dc.identifier.epage710en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000289671700009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, B=35449624300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, C=24558634700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, X=35235904500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=7502094052en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9048334-

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