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Article: Flood basalt-related Fe-Ti oxide deposits in the Emeishan large igneous province, SW China

TitleFlood basalt-related Fe-Ti oxide deposits in the Emeishan large igneous province, SW China
Authors
KeywordsEmeishan
Fe-Ti oxide ore
Flood basalt
Layered intrusion
Panxi
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/lithos
Citation
Lithos, 2010, v. 119 n. 1-2, p. 123-136 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the Panzhihua-Xichang region (Sichuan Province, SW China), there are a number of world-class magmatic Fe-Ti oxide deposits. They are hosted as conformable masses in lower parts of layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions that are part of the end-Guadalupian (~260Ma) Emeishan large igneous province. The ore-bearing Panzhihua, Hongge, Baima, Taihe and Xinjie intrusions are spatially and temporally associated with flood basalts and granitoids in the province. New mineralogical data for Fe-Ti oxide ores in the Hongge and Baima intrusions, combined with an overview of previously published data, provide a better understanding on the formation of these enigmatic deposits. Geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data confirm a genetic relation between the intrusions and high-Ti Emeishan flood basalts. Parental magma compositions, estimated using the most Mg-rich cumulus olivine in the intrusions, are characterized by slight to moderate degrees of fractionation (MgO=7.2-11wt.%). Occurrences of rare Cr-bearing titanomagnetite (Cr 2O 3=1.2-10.7wt.%) in the Panzhihua, Hongge and Xinjie intrusions are consistent with early crystallization of Fe-Ti oxides. Oxide-silicate equilibria and low V concentration (<4800ppm) in magnetite are consistent with relatively high oxygen fugacity. Flood basalt-related origin, early Fe-Ti oxide crystallization and relatively high oxygen fugacity, are characteristic of Fe-Ti oxide deposits in the Panxi region but are fundamentally different from those hosted in highly-differentiated, upper parts of large layered intrusions (e.g. the Bushveld Complex). Similar Fe-Ti oxide deposits have not been documented in other well-studied large igneous provinces to date, but a number of Fe-Ti oxide ore occurrences worldwide are potentially similar to this type of flood basalt-related oxide deposits. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139219
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.723
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.920
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Chinese 973 project2007CB411401
CAS/SAFEAKZCX2-YW-t004
Chinese Academy of SciencesKZCX2-YW-BR-09
Funding Information:

We thank Yuxiao Ma and Jun-Hong Zhao for assistance in the 2004 field excursion Comments by guest editor Sun-Lin Chung, overseeing editor Nelson Eby and reviewers Bernard Charlier and James Scoates markedly improved the quality of the paper. Logistic support by Panzhihua Steel Co. Ltd. is gratefully acknowledged. This work is partially supported by a Chinese 973 project (2007CB411401) to MFZ and CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams (KZCX2-YW-t004). Additional support was obtained from a "CAS Hundred Talents" Project from Chinese Academy of Sciences (KZCX2-YW-BR-09) to LQ.

References
Errata

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPang, KNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, MFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQi, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorShellnutt, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:47:13Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:47:13Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLithos, 2010, v. 119 n. 1-2, p. 123-136en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0024-4937en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139219-
dc.description.abstractIn the Panzhihua-Xichang region (Sichuan Province, SW China), there are a number of world-class magmatic Fe-Ti oxide deposits. They are hosted as conformable masses in lower parts of layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions that are part of the end-Guadalupian (~260Ma) Emeishan large igneous province. The ore-bearing Panzhihua, Hongge, Baima, Taihe and Xinjie intrusions are spatially and temporally associated with flood basalts and granitoids in the province. New mineralogical data for Fe-Ti oxide ores in the Hongge and Baima intrusions, combined with an overview of previously published data, provide a better understanding on the formation of these enigmatic deposits. Geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data confirm a genetic relation between the intrusions and high-Ti Emeishan flood basalts. Parental magma compositions, estimated using the most Mg-rich cumulus olivine in the intrusions, are characterized by slight to moderate degrees of fractionation (MgO=7.2-11wt.%). Occurrences of rare Cr-bearing titanomagnetite (Cr 2O 3=1.2-10.7wt.%) in the Panzhihua, Hongge and Xinjie intrusions are consistent with early crystallization of Fe-Ti oxides. Oxide-silicate equilibria and low V concentration (<4800ppm) in magnetite are consistent with relatively high oxygen fugacity. Flood basalt-related origin, early Fe-Ti oxide crystallization and relatively high oxygen fugacity, are characteristic of Fe-Ti oxide deposits in the Panxi region but are fundamentally different from those hosted in highly-differentiated, upper parts of large layered intrusions (e.g. the Bushveld Complex). Similar Fe-Ti oxide deposits have not been documented in other well-studied large igneous provinces to date, but a number of Fe-Ti oxide ore occurrences worldwide are potentially similar to this type of flood basalt-related oxide deposits. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/lithosen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLithosen_HK
dc.subjectEmeishanen_HK
dc.subjectFe-Ti oxide oreen_HK
dc.subjectFlood basalten_HK
dc.subjectLayered intrusionen_HK
dc.subjectPanxien_HK
dc.titleFlood basalt-related Fe-Ti oxide deposits in the Emeishan large igneous province, SW Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhou, MF:mfzhou@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, MF=rp00844en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.lithos.2010.06.003en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77956456778en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros195326en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77956456778&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume119en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage123en_HK
dc.identifier.epage136en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283015800012-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.relation.erratumdoi:10.1016/j.lithos.2012.12.009-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPang, KN=23493522200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, MF=7403506005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQi, L=7202149924en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShellnutt, G=36171035500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, CY=34976092700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, D=36509465000en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7377746-

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