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Article: Detrital and xenocrystic zircon ages from Neoproterozoic to Palaeozoic arc terranes of Mongolia: Significance for the origin of crustal fragments in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

TitleDetrital and xenocrystic zircon ages from Neoproterozoic to Palaeozoic arc terranes of Mongolia: Significance for the origin of crustal fragments in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt
Authors
KeywordsCentral Asian Orogenic Belt
Detrital age
Microcontinent
Mongolia
Probability plot
Tarim
Zircon
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcr
Citation
Gondwana Research, 2011, v. 19 n. 3, p. 751-763 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Central Asian Orogenic Belt contains many Precambrian crustal fragments whose origin is unknown, and previous speculations suggested these to be derived from either Siberia, Tarim or northern Gondwana. We present an age pattern for detrital and xenocrystic zircons from Neoproterozoic to Palaeozoic arc and microcontinental terranes in Mongolia and compare this with patterns for Precambrian rocks in southern Siberia, the North China craton, the Tarim craton and northeastern Gondwana in order to define the most likely source region for the Mongolian zircons. Our data were obtained by SHRIMP II, LA-ICP-MS and single zircon evaporation and predominantly represent arc-related low-grade volcanic rocks and clastic sediments but also accretionary wedges and ophiolitic environments. The Mongolian pattern is dominated by zircons in the age range ca. 350-600 and 700-1020. Ma as well as minor peaks between ca. 1240 and 2570. Ma. The youngest group reflects cannibalistic reworking of the Palaeozoic arc terranes, whereas the Neoproterozoic to late Mesoproterozoic peak reflects both reworking of the arc terranes as well as Neoproterozoic rifting and a Grenville-age crust-formation event. The 700-1020. Ma peak does not exist in the age spectra of the Siberian and North China cratons and thus effectively rules out these basement blocks as potential source areas for the Mongolian zircons. The best agreement is with the Tarim craton where a major Grenville-age orogenic event and early Neoproterozoic rifting have been identified. The age spectra also do not entirely exclude northeastern Gondwana as a source for the Mongolian zircons, but here the Neoproterozoic age peak is related to the Pan-African orogeny, and a minor Grenville-age peak may reflect a controversial orogenic event in NW India. Our Mongolian detrital and xenocrystic age spectrum suggests that the Tarim craton was the main source, and we favour a tectonic scenario similar to the present southwestern Pacific where fragments of Australia are rifted off and become incorporated into the Indonesian arc and microcontinent amalgamation that will evolve into a future orogenic belt. © 2010 International Association for Gondwana Research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139202
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.743
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.949
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Volkswagen FoundationI/76399
German Science Foundation (DFG)KR 590/90-1
Beijing SHRIMP Centre
German Exchange Service (DAAD)
Hong Kong Research Council
Funding Information:

This research is part of a collaborative study with the Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources, Mongolian Academy of Sciences, the Beijing SHRIMP Centre, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, and the University of Hong Kong. We acknowledge funding of the Volkswagen Foundation, grant I/76399 to A.K., the German Science Foundation (DFG), grant KR 590/90-1 to A.K., the Beijing SHRIMP Centre, and travel grants of the German Exchange Service (DAAD) and the Hong Kong Research Council as part of a Germany-Hong Kong exchange agreement. We thank Rick Squire, Melbourne, for providing Fig. 6 and the northern Gondwana data. Hui Zhou and Chun Yang of the Beijing SHRIMP Centre provided the zircon CL images, and Qing Ye, Hua Tao prepared perfect zircon mounts. Discussions with D. Alexeiev, Moscow, X. Long, Guangzhou and D. Tomurhuu, Ulaanbaatar, are gratefully acknowledged. We dedicate this contribution to the memory of our Mongolian colleague G. Badarch without whose field guidance, discussions and help in understanding Mongolian geology this study would not have been possible. This is a contribution to IGCP Project 480, to the ILP-Project ERAS (Earth Accretionary Systems) and to the Mainz Earth System Research Centre.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRojasAgramonte, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKröner, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDemoux, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXia, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDonskaya, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:46:35Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:46:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGondwana Research, 2011, v. 19 n. 3, p. 751-763en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1342-937Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139202-
dc.description.abstractThe Central Asian Orogenic Belt contains many Precambrian crustal fragments whose origin is unknown, and previous speculations suggested these to be derived from either Siberia, Tarim or northern Gondwana. We present an age pattern for detrital and xenocrystic zircons from Neoproterozoic to Palaeozoic arc and microcontinental terranes in Mongolia and compare this with patterns for Precambrian rocks in southern Siberia, the North China craton, the Tarim craton and northeastern Gondwana in order to define the most likely source region for the Mongolian zircons. Our data were obtained by SHRIMP II, LA-ICP-MS and single zircon evaporation and predominantly represent arc-related low-grade volcanic rocks and clastic sediments but also accretionary wedges and ophiolitic environments. The Mongolian pattern is dominated by zircons in the age range ca. 350-600 and 700-1020. Ma as well as minor peaks between ca. 1240 and 2570. Ma. The youngest group reflects cannibalistic reworking of the Palaeozoic arc terranes, whereas the Neoproterozoic to late Mesoproterozoic peak reflects both reworking of the arc terranes as well as Neoproterozoic rifting and a Grenville-age crust-formation event. The 700-1020. Ma peak does not exist in the age spectra of the Siberian and North China cratons and thus effectively rules out these basement blocks as potential source areas for the Mongolian zircons. The best agreement is with the Tarim craton where a major Grenville-age orogenic event and early Neoproterozoic rifting have been identified. The age spectra also do not entirely exclude northeastern Gondwana as a source for the Mongolian zircons, but here the Neoproterozoic age peak is related to the Pan-African orogeny, and a minor Grenville-age peak may reflect a controversial orogenic event in NW India. Our Mongolian detrital and xenocrystic age spectrum suggests that the Tarim craton was the main source, and we favour a tectonic scenario similar to the present southwestern Pacific where fragments of Australia are rifted off and become incorporated into the Indonesian arc and microcontinent amalgamation that will evolve into a future orogenic belt. © 2010 International Association for Gondwana Research.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcren_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGondwana Researchen_HK
dc.subjectCentral Asian Orogenic Belten_HK
dc.subjectDetrital ageen_HK
dc.subjectMicrocontinenten_HK
dc.subjectMongoliaen_HK
dc.subjectProbability ploten_HK
dc.subjectTarimen_HK
dc.subjectZirconen_HK
dc.titleDetrital and xenocrystic zircon ages from Neoproterozoic to Palaeozoic arc terranes of Mongolia: Significance for the origin of crustal fragments in the Central Asian Orogenic Belten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailXia, X: xpxia@hotmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSun, M: minsun@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityXia, X=rp00815en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySun, M=rp00780en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gr.2010.10.004en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952072989en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros194387en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79952072989&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage751en_HK
dc.identifier.epage763en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000289047000013-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRojasAgramonte, Y=36174436600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKröner, A=7006453132en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDemoux, A=25921923200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXia, X=35241486400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, W=49964922400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDonskaya, T=55406672800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, D=7410099304en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, M=25932315800en_HK

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