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Article: The geomicrobiology of bauxite deposits

TitleThe geomicrobiology of bauxite deposits
Authors
KeywordsBauxite
Biomineralization
Geomicrobiology
Microbial activity
Microbial-mediated release of elements
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/16749871
Citation
Geoscience Frontiers, 2010, v. 1 n. 1, p. 81-89 How to Cite?
AbstractBauxite deposits are studied because of their economic value and because they play an important role in the study of paleoclimate and paleogeography of continents. They provide a rare record of the weathering and evolution of continental surfaces. Geomicrobiological analysis makes it possible to verify that microorganisms have played a critical role during the formation of bauxite with the possibility already intimated in previous studies. Ambient temperature, abundance of water, organic carbon and bioavailable iron and other metal substrates provide a suitable environment for microbes to inhabit. Thiobacillus, Leptospirilum, Thermophilic bacteria and Heterotrophs have been shown to be able to oxidize ferrous iron and to reduce sulfate-generating sulfuric acid, which can accelerate the weathering of aluminosilicates and precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides. Microorganisms referred to the genus Bacillus can mediate the release of alkaline metals. Although the dissimilatory iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in bauxites have not yet been identified, some recorded authigenic carbonates and "bacteriopyrites" that appear to be unique in morphology and grain size might record microbial activity. Typical bauxite minerals such as gibbsite, kaolinite, covellite, galena, pyrite, zircon, calcium plagioclase, orthoclase, and albite have been investigated as part of an analysis of microbial mediation. The paleoecology of such bauxitic microorganisms inhabiting continental (sub) surfaces, revealed through geomicrobiological analysis, will add a further dimension to paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental studies. © 2010, China University of Geosciences (Beijing) and Peking University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139200
ISSN
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.831
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHao, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:46:34Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:46:34Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGeoscience Frontiers, 2010, v. 1 n. 1, p. 81-89en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1674-9871en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139200-
dc.description.abstractBauxite deposits are studied because of their economic value and because they play an important role in the study of paleoclimate and paleogeography of continents. They provide a rare record of the weathering and evolution of continental surfaces. Geomicrobiological analysis makes it possible to verify that microorganisms have played a critical role during the formation of bauxite with the possibility already intimated in previous studies. Ambient temperature, abundance of water, organic carbon and bioavailable iron and other metal substrates provide a suitable environment for microbes to inhabit. Thiobacillus, Leptospirilum, Thermophilic bacteria and Heterotrophs have been shown to be able to oxidize ferrous iron and to reduce sulfate-generating sulfuric acid, which can accelerate the weathering of aluminosilicates and precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides. Microorganisms referred to the genus Bacillus can mediate the release of alkaline metals. Although the dissimilatory iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in bauxites have not yet been identified, some recorded authigenic carbonates and "bacteriopyrites" that appear to be unique in morphology and grain size might record microbial activity. Typical bauxite minerals such as gibbsite, kaolinite, covellite, galena, pyrite, zircon, calcium plagioclase, orthoclase, and albite have been investigated as part of an analysis of microbial mediation. The paleoecology of such bauxitic microorganisms inhabiting continental (sub) surfaces, revealed through geomicrobiological analysis, will add a further dimension to paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental studies. © 2010, China University of Geosciences (Beijing) and Peking University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/16749871en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGeoscience Frontiersen_HK
dc.subjectBauxiteen_HK
dc.subjectBiomineralizationen_HK
dc.subjectGeomicrobiologyen_HK
dc.subjectMicrobial activityen_HK
dc.subjectMicrobial-mediated release of elementsen_HK
dc.titleThe geomicrobiology of bauxite depositsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:yiliang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp01354en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gsf.2010.06.001en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649988572en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros194111en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649988572&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume1en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage81en_HK
dc.identifier.epage89en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHao, X=36706030200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, K=36706336000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, R=35224383300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, W=7404011201en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=27171876700en_HK

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