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Article: The Khanka Block, NE China, and its significance for the evolution of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt and continental accretion

TitleThe Khanka Block, NE China, and its significance for the evolution of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt and continental accretion
Authors
KeywordsBlueschist facies
Granitoid
Inductively coupled plasma method
Ion microprobe
North china block
Issue Date2010
PublisherGeological Society Publishing House. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/sp
Citation
Geological Society Special Publication, 2010, v. 338 n. 1, p. 117-137 How to Cite?
Abstract
Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry U-Pb dating of zircons from granitoids and paragneiss in the Chinese segment of the Khanka Block reveals that granite magmatism occurred at 518±7 Ma and was followed shortly after by high-grade metamorphism at c. 500 Ma (timing ranging from 491±4 Ma in medium-grained granitoid, through 499±10 Ma in porphyritic granite, to 501±8 Ma in paragneiss). Such a scenario has previously been established on similar lithologies in the Jiamusi Block to the west, with identical ages. This suggests that the Khanka and Jiamusi blocks form part of a single terrane and that the Dunhua-Mishan Fault, which was previously considered to separate two unique terranes, cannot be a terrane boundary fault. Previous suggestions of a link between the Khanka Block and the Hida Block in Japan are not supported following a comparison of the new zircon data with published ages for the Japanese terranes. A granitoid with an age of 112±1 Ma in the Khanka Block probably records the effect of Pacific plate subduction, as such ages are common further south in the extreme eastern part of the North China Craton, where they have been related to post-collisional extension and lithospheric thinning in the Jiaodong Peninsula. The presence of such young granitoids, and the previous dating of blueschist-facies metamorphism as late Early Jurassic in the Heilongjiang Complex of the Jiamusi Block, supports the view that the current location of the Jiamusi-Khanka terrane is a product of circum-Pacific accretion rather than it being a microcontinental block that was trapped by the northward collision of the North China Craton with Siberia as part of the assembly of the main Central Asian Orogenic Belt. © 2010 The Geological Society of London.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139192
ISSN
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.856
References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Institute of Geology and Geophysics Chinese Academy of Sciences
  3. Curtin University of Technology, The Institute for Geoscience Research
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilde, SAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:46:30Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:46:30Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGeological Society Special Publication, 2010, v. 338 n. 1, p. 117-137en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0305-8719en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139192-
dc.description.abstractSensitive high-resolution ion microprobe and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry U-Pb dating of zircons from granitoids and paragneiss in the Chinese segment of the Khanka Block reveals that granite magmatism occurred at 518±7 Ma and was followed shortly after by high-grade metamorphism at c. 500 Ma (timing ranging from 491±4 Ma in medium-grained granitoid, through 499±10 Ma in porphyritic granite, to 501±8 Ma in paragneiss). Such a scenario has previously been established on similar lithologies in the Jiamusi Block to the west, with identical ages. This suggests that the Khanka and Jiamusi blocks form part of a single terrane and that the Dunhua-Mishan Fault, which was previously considered to separate two unique terranes, cannot be a terrane boundary fault. Previous suggestions of a link between the Khanka Block and the Hida Block in Japan are not supported following a comparison of the new zircon data with published ages for the Japanese terranes. A granitoid with an age of 112±1 Ma in the Khanka Block probably records the effect of Pacific plate subduction, as such ages are common further south in the extreme eastern part of the North China Craton, where they have been related to post-collisional extension and lithospheric thinning in the Jiaodong Peninsula. The presence of such young granitoids, and the previous dating of blueschist-facies metamorphism as late Early Jurassic in the Heilongjiang Complex of the Jiamusi Block, supports the view that the current location of the Jiamusi-Khanka terrane is a product of circum-Pacific accretion rather than it being a microcontinental block that was trapped by the northward collision of the North China Craton with Siberia as part of the assembly of the main Central Asian Orogenic Belt. © 2010 The Geological Society of London.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherGeological Society Publishing House. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/spen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGeological Society Special Publicationen_HK
dc.subjectBlueschist facies-
dc.subjectGranitoid-
dc.subjectInductively coupled plasma method-
dc.subjectIon microprobe-
dc.subjectNorth china block-
dc.titleThe Khanka Block, NE China, and its significance for the evolution of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt and continental accretionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0305-8719&volume=338&issue=1&spage=117&epage=137&date=2010&atitle=The+Khanka+Block,+NE+China,+and+its+significance+for+the+evolution+of+the+Central+Asian+Orogenic+Belt+and+continental+accretion-
dc.identifier.emailZhao, G:gzhao@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhao, G=rp00842en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1144/SP338.6en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053369945en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193925en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053369945&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume338en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage117en_HK
dc.identifier.epage137en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilde, SA=35254758600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, F=40561925600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, G=7403296321en_HK

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