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Article: Mid-Holocene coastal hydrology and salinity changes in the east Taihu area of the lower Yangtze wetlands, China

TitleMid-Holocene coastal hydrology and salinity changes in the east Taihu area of the lower Yangtze wetlands, China
Authors
KeywordsCoastal environment
Diatoms
Mid-Holocene
Neolithic cultures
Sea level
Taihu Lake
Issue Date2011
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yqres
Citation
Quaternary Research, 2011, v. 76 n. 1, p. 69-82 How to Cite?
AbstractDuring the mid-Holocene the eastern Taihu area, on China's Yangtze delta plain, was populated by advanced late Neolithic cultures supported by intensive domesticated rice cultivation. This agricultural system collapsed around 4200cal yr BP, with severe population decline, the end of the Liangzhu culture, and about half a millennium of very low-scale human activity in the area before the re-establishment of agricultural production. Microfossil analyses from six sedimentary sequences, supported by AMS 14C dating, has allowed reconstruction of mid-Holocene hydrological conditions and salinity changes which would have had a major influence on agricultural viability and cultural history in the coastal wetlands. These data, allied to existing stratigraphic and sea-level records, show that chenier ridges that developed after ca. 7000cal yr BP in the east of the area sheltered it from marine inundation and, although still connected to the sea through tidal creeks, low-salinity conditions persisted throughout the Neolithic period. There is no evidence that marine flooding caused the collapse of Liangzhu culture. Marine influence was stable and evolved slowly. Social and cultural causes may also have been important, but if environmental change triggered the collapse of Neolithic agricultural society here, other natural forces must be sought to explain this event. © 2011 University of Washington.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139156
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.198
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.317
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Leverhulme Trust, UKF/00128/AL
Funding Information:

This study was funded by the Leverhulme Trust, UK (F/00128/AL). We thank Dr J. Chen of the Shanghai Museum for his advice on Neolithic settlement sites, and Dr. F. Yu, B. Zhao, Z. Wang, Q Zhan, B. Chen, Y. Xie, D. Zhang, Z. Xu and H. Wang for fieldwork assistance.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZong, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorInnes, JBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:46:08Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:46:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationQuaternary Research, 2011, v. 76 n. 1, p. 69-82en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0033-5894en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139156-
dc.description.abstractDuring the mid-Holocene the eastern Taihu area, on China's Yangtze delta plain, was populated by advanced late Neolithic cultures supported by intensive domesticated rice cultivation. This agricultural system collapsed around 4200cal yr BP, with severe population decline, the end of the Liangzhu culture, and about half a millennium of very low-scale human activity in the area before the re-establishment of agricultural production. Microfossil analyses from six sedimentary sequences, supported by AMS 14C dating, has allowed reconstruction of mid-Holocene hydrological conditions and salinity changes which would have had a major influence on agricultural viability and cultural history in the coastal wetlands. These data, allied to existing stratigraphic and sea-level records, show that chenier ridges that developed after ca. 7000cal yr BP in the east of the area sheltered it from marine inundation and, although still connected to the sea through tidal creeks, low-salinity conditions persisted throughout the Neolithic period. There is no evidence that marine flooding caused the collapse of Liangzhu culture. Marine influence was stable and evolved slowly. Social and cultural causes may also have been important, but if environmental change triggered the collapse of Neolithic agricultural society here, other natural forces must be sought to explain this event. © 2011 University of Washington.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yqresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofQuaternary Researchen_HK
dc.subjectCoastal environmenten_HK
dc.subjectDiatomsen_HK
dc.subjectMid-Holoceneen_HK
dc.subjectNeolithic culturesen_HK
dc.subjectSea levelen_HK
dc.subjectTaihu Lakeen_HK
dc.titleMid-Holocene coastal hydrology and salinity changes in the east Taihu area of the lower Yangtze wetlands, Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZong, Y:yqzong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZong, Y=rp00846en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.yqres.2011.03.005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959194590en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros193786en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959194590&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume76en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage69en_HK
dc.identifier.epage82en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292175700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZong, Y=7005203454en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridInnes, JB=7102004815en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Z=8888585200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, Z=35209923100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9229342-

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