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Article: Coral communities of Hong Kong: Long-lived corals in a marginal reef environment

TitleCoral communities of Hong Kong: Long-lived corals in a marginal reef environment
Authors
KeywordsHong Kong
Long-lived massive corals
Porites
South China Sea
Issue Date2011
PublisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.html
Citation
Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2011, v. 426, p. 185-196 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong's coastal waters afford a marginal environment for coral reef growth, with high seasonal and short-term variability in water temperatures (ranging from <14°C in winter to 31°C in summer), and low summer salinity (as low as 15 psu) due to runoff associated with the Asian wet monsoon season and the Pearl River Delta. Yet Hong Kong hosts 84 reef-building coral species in 28 genera of 12 families of the Scleractinia, distributed in 5 broad communities with strong geographic and environmental affinities and key indicator species. Coral communities farthest from the influence of the Pearl River Delta have relatively high sea bed coverage and species diversity (30 to 50% coverage, and >30 spp. per site), and also host some large, old corals. X-radiographs of a core of one massive Porites colony confirms ̃200 yr of growth, with 2 short-term periods of mortality, hidden in the skeleton by overgrowth. Very low linear extension rates (<4 mm yr-1) in this coral and 2 others are anomalous for Porites corals and are indicative of the high-stress environment. Low growth rates suggest that other Hong Kong corals, despite the harsh environmental conditions, may also live for centuries, contributing to the development of 'incipient reefs. © 2011 Inter-Research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139146
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.361
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.554
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
University of Hong Kong
Ocean Park Conservation Foundation
Funding Information:

Several reviewers commented on this manuscript in detail, providing suggestions that greatly improved it. The authors acknowledge the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, for assistance in permitting and funding the coral survey performed by L. D. and D. M., and we thank W. Yim for access to equipment. Funding for this project was provided by the University of Hong Kong and the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGoodkin, NFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSwitzer, ADen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcCorry, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorDeVantier, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorTrue, JDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHughen, KAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAngeline, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTeng Yang, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:45:59Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:45:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series, 2011, v. 426, p. 185-196en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139146-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong's coastal waters afford a marginal environment for coral reef growth, with high seasonal and short-term variability in water temperatures (ranging from <14°C in winter to 31°C in summer), and low summer salinity (as low as 15 psu) due to runoff associated with the Asian wet monsoon season and the Pearl River Delta. Yet Hong Kong hosts 84 reef-building coral species in 28 genera of 12 families of the Scleractinia, distributed in 5 broad communities with strong geographic and environmental affinities and key indicator species. Coral communities farthest from the influence of the Pearl River Delta have relatively high sea bed coverage and species diversity (30 to 50% coverage, and >30 spp. per site), and also host some large, old corals. X-radiographs of a core of one massive Porites colony confirms ̃200 yr of growth, with 2 short-term periods of mortality, hidden in the skeleton by overgrowth. Very low linear extension rates (<4 mm yr-1) in this coral and 2 others are anomalous for Porites corals and are indicative of the high-stress environment. Low growth rates suggest that other Hong Kong corals, despite the harsh environmental conditions, may also live for centuries, contributing to the development of 'incipient reefs. © 2011 Inter-Research.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Ecology Progress Seriesen_HK
dc.rightsMarine Ecology - Progress Series. Copyright © Inter-Research.-
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectLong-lived massive coralsen_HK
dc.subjectPoritesen_HK
dc.subjectSouth China Seaen_HK
dc.titleCoral communities of Hong Kong: Long-lived corals in a marginal reef environmenten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGoodkin, NF:goodkin@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGoodkin, NF=rp00700en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps09019en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953169483en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros192085en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79953169483&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume426en_HK
dc.identifier.spage185en_HK
dc.identifier.epage196en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000288984400014-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGoodkin, NF=12446578100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSwitzer, AD=10738884500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcCorry, D=6507303849en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeVantier, L=7801513912en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTrue, JD=49662195000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHughen, KA=6701562711en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAngeline, N=36999725900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTeng Yang, T=37062241200en_HK

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