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Article: Lateralization of the arcuate fasciculus and its differential correlation with reading ability between young learners and experienced readers: A diffusion tensor tractography study in a chinese cohort

TitleLateralization of the arcuate fasciculus and its differential correlation with reading ability between young learners and experienced readers: A diffusion tensor tractography study in a chinese cohort
Authors
KeywordsArcuate fasciculus
DTI
Gender
Language
MRI
Reading
Superior longitudinal fasciculus
Tractography
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751
Citation
Human Brain Mapping, 2011, v. 32 n. 12, p. 2054-2063 How to Cite?
AbstractAs Chinese reading engages a different neural network from alphabetic language reading, we investigate whether leftward lateralization of the arcuate fasciculus (AF), as observed in the Western population, is also present in the Chinese population and if it does, whether it is associated with better reading ability. Diffusion tensor tractography analysis on 75 Chinese subjects of three age groups (first graders, fourth graders, and college students) showed that 70-83% of them had leftward lateralization of the AF. The pattern of lateralization did not differ significantly among the three groups, suggesting that lateralization of the AF is formed at an early age and before one enters first grade. Among the first graders, who had just started to learn to read, subjects with strongly leftward lateralized AF scored significantly higher than those with other defined lateralization patterns in Chinese (P = 0.001) and English (P = 0.036) reading tasks. This association was not observed among the fourth graders and college students who were experienced Chinese readers. Among the fourth graders, females were found to obtain significantly higher Chinese (P = 0.033) and English reading scores than males (P = 0.002). Our study suggests a differential effect of leftward lateralization of the AF on reading ability at different stages of reading development in the Chinese population. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139129
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.962
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.165
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ministry of Science and Technology of China2005CB522802
Funding Information:

Contract grant sponsor: Ministry of Science and Technology of China; Contract grant number: 2005CB522802.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSiok, WTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:45:36Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:45:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHuman Brain Mapping, 2011, v. 32 n. 12, p. 2054-2063en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1065-9471en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139129-
dc.description.abstractAs Chinese reading engages a different neural network from alphabetic language reading, we investigate whether leftward lateralization of the arcuate fasciculus (AF), as observed in the Western population, is also present in the Chinese population and if it does, whether it is associated with better reading ability. Diffusion tensor tractography analysis on 75 Chinese subjects of three age groups (first graders, fourth graders, and college students) showed that 70-83% of them had leftward lateralization of the AF. The pattern of lateralization did not differ significantly among the three groups, suggesting that lateralization of the AF is formed at an early age and before one enters first grade. Among the first graders, who had just started to learn to read, subjects with strongly leftward lateralized AF scored significantly higher than those with other defined lateralization patterns in Chinese (P = 0.001) and English (P = 0.036) reading tasks. This association was not observed among the fourth graders and college students who were experienced Chinese readers. Among the fourth graders, females were found to obtain significantly higher Chinese (P = 0.033) and English reading scores than males (P = 0.002). Our study suggests a differential effect of leftward lateralization of the AF on reading ability at different stages of reading development in the Chinese population. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Brain Mappingen_HK
dc.rightsHuman Brain Mapping. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectArcuate fasciculusen_HK
dc.subjectDTIen_HK
dc.subjectGenderen_HK
dc.subjectLanguageen_HK
dc.subjectMRIen_HK
dc.subjectReadingen_HK
dc.subjectSuperior longitudinal fasciculusen_HK
dc.subjectTractographyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBrain - physiology-
dc.subject.meshBrain Mapping-
dc.subject.meshFunctional Laterality - physiology-
dc.subject.meshLearning - physiology-
dc.subject.meshReading-
dc.titleLateralization of the arcuate fasciculus and its differential correlation with reading ability between young learners and experienced readers: A diffusion tensor tractography study in a chinese cohorten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSiok, WT: siok@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKhong, PL: plkhong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySiok, WT=rp01208en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKhong, PL=rp00467en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hbm.21168en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21259386-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81055126443en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros192097en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros208945-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-81055126443&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume32en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2054en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2063en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297918500003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiu, D=12778150600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSiok, WT=6602471035en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, K=36246938500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhong, PL=7006693233en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8815575-

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