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Article: Reduced transverse relaxation rate (RR2) for improved sensitivity in monitoring myocardial iron in thalassemia
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TitleReduced transverse relaxation rate (RR2) for improved sensitivity in monitoring myocardial iron in thalassemia
 
AuthorsCheung, JS2 4
Au, WY4
Ha, SY4
Kim, D1
Jensen, JH1
Zhou, IY4
Cheung, MM4
Wu, Y4
Guo, H5 4
Khong, PL4
Brown, TR3
Brittenham, GM6
Wu, EX4
 
Keywordscardiac MR
chelation therapy
ferritin
heart
hemosiderin
iron overload
MRI
RR2
thalassemia
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1053-1807/
 
CitationJournal Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2011, v. 33 n. 6, p. 1510-1516 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.22553
 
AbstractPurpose: To evaluate the reduced transverse relaxation rate (RR2), a new relaxation index which has been shown recently to be primarily sensitive to intracellular ferritin iron, as a means of detecting short-term changes in myocardial storage iron produced by iron-chelating therapy in transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients. Materials and Methods: A single-breathhold multi-echo fast spin-echo sequence was implemented at 3 Tesla (T) to estimate RR2 by acquiring signal decays with interecho times of 5, 9 and 13 ms. Transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients (N = 8) were examined immediately before suspending iron-chelating therapy for 1 week (Day 0), after a 1-week suspension of chelation (Day 7), and after a 1-week resumption of chelation (Day 14). Results: The mean percent changes in RR2, R2, and R2* off chelation (between Day 0 and 7) were 11.9 ± 8.9%, 5.4 ± 7.7% and -4.4 ± 25.0%; and, after resuming chelation (between Day 7 and 14), -10.6 ± 13.9%, -8.9 ± 8.0% and -8.5 ± 24.3%, respectively. Significant differences in R2 and RR2 were observed between Day 0 and 7, and between Day 7 and 14, with the greatest proportional changes in RR2. No significant differences in R2* were found. Conclusion: These initial results demonstrate that significant differences in RR2 are detectable after a single week of changes in iron-chelating therapy, likely as a result of superior sensitivity to soluble ferritin iron, which is in close equilibrium with the chelatable cytosolic iron pool. RR2 measurement may provide a new means of monitoring the short-term effectiveness of iron-chelating agents in patients with myocardial iron overload. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
 
ISSN1053-1807
2013 Impact Factor: 2.788
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.22553
 
PubMed Central IDPMC3098046
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000291267700028
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grant CouncilGRF7794/07M
Hong Kong Children Thalassaemia Foundation2007/02
National Institutes of HealthR01-DK069373
R01-DK066251
R37-DK049108
R01-DK049108
American Heart Association0730143N
Funding Information:

Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong Research Grant Council; Contract grant number: GRF7794/07M; Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong Children Thalassaemia Foundation; Contract grant number: 2007/02; Contract grant sponsor: National Institutes of Health; Contract grant numbers: R01-DK069373, R01-DK066251, R37-DK049108, R01-DK049108; Contract grant sponsor: American Heart Association; Contract grant number: 0730143N.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, JS
 
dc.contributor.authorAu, WY
 
dc.contributor.authorHa, SY
 
dc.contributor.authorKim, D
 
dc.contributor.authorJensen, JH
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, IY
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MM
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorGuo, H
 
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PL
 
dc.contributor.authorBrown, TR
 
dc.contributor.authorBrittenham, GM
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, EX
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:45:34Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:45:34Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To evaluate the reduced transverse relaxation rate (RR2), a new relaxation index which has been shown recently to be primarily sensitive to intracellular ferritin iron, as a means of detecting short-term changes in myocardial storage iron produced by iron-chelating therapy in transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients. Materials and Methods: A single-breathhold multi-echo fast spin-echo sequence was implemented at 3 Tesla (T) to estimate RR2 by acquiring signal decays with interecho times of 5, 9 and 13 ms. Transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients (N = 8) were examined immediately before suspending iron-chelating therapy for 1 week (Day 0), after a 1-week suspension of chelation (Day 7), and after a 1-week resumption of chelation (Day 14). Results: The mean percent changes in RR2, R2, and R2* off chelation (between Day 0 and 7) were 11.9 ± 8.9%, 5.4 ± 7.7% and -4.4 ± 25.0%; and, after resuming chelation (between Day 7 and 14), -10.6 ± 13.9%, -8.9 ± 8.0% and -8.5 ± 24.3%, respectively. Significant differences in R2 and RR2 were observed between Day 0 and 7, and between Day 7 and 14, with the greatest proportional changes in RR2. No significant differences in R2* were found. Conclusion: These initial results demonstrate that significant differences in RR2 are detectable after a single week of changes in iron-chelating therapy, likely as a result of superior sensitivity to soluble ferritin iron, which is in close equilibrium with the chelatable cytosolic iron pool. RR2 measurement may provide a new means of monitoring the short-term effectiveness of iron-chelating agents in patients with myocardial iron overload. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2011, v. 33 n. 6, p. 1510-1516 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.22553
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.22553
 
dc.identifier.epage1516
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192054
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291267700028
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Research Grant CouncilGRF7794/07M
Hong Kong Children Thalassaemia Foundation2007/02
National Institutes of HealthR01-DK069373
R01-DK066251
R37-DK049108
R01-DK049108
American Heart Association0730143N
Funding Information:

Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong Research Grant Council; Contract grant number: GRF7794/07M; Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong Children Thalassaemia Foundation; Contract grant number: 2007/02; Contract grant sponsor: National Institutes of Health; Contract grant numbers: R01-DK069373, R01-DK066251, R37-DK049108, R01-DK049108; Contract grant sponsor: American Heart Association; Contract grant number: 0730143N.

 
dc.identifier.issn1053-1807
2013 Impact Factor: 2.788
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3098046
 
dc.identifier.pmid21591022
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79958254314
 
dc.identifier.spage1510
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139127
 
dc.identifier.volume33
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1053-1807/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
 
dc.subject.meshBlood Transfusion
 
dc.subject.meshChelating Agents - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshIron - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshMyocardium - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshThalassemia - diagnosis - pathology
 
dc.subjectcardiac MR
 
dc.subjectchelation therapy
 
dc.subjectferritin
 
dc.subjectheart
 
dc.subjecthemosiderin
 
dc.subjectiron overload
 
dc.subjectMRI
 
dc.subjectRR2
 
dc.subjectthalassemia
 
dc.titleReduced transverse relaxation rate (RR2) for improved sensitivity in monitoring myocardial iron in thalassemia
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Jensen, JH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhou, IY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheung, MM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wu, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Guo, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Khong, PL</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Purpose: To evaluate the reduced transverse relaxation rate (RR2), a new relaxation index which has been shown recently to be primarily sensitive to intracellular ferritin iron, as a means of detecting short-term changes in myocardial storage iron produced by iron-chelating therapy in transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients. Materials and Methods: A single-breathhold multi-echo fast spin-echo sequence was implemented at 3 Tesla (T) to estimate RR2 by acquiring signal decays with interecho times of 5, 9 and 13 ms. Transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients (N = 8) were examined immediately before suspending iron-chelating therapy for 1 week (Day 0), after a 1-week suspension of chelation (Day 7), and after a 1-week resumption of chelation (Day 14). Results: The mean percent changes in RR2, R2, and R2* off chelation (between Day 0 and 7) were 11.9 &#177; 8.9%, 5.4 &#177; 7.7% and -4.4 &#177; 25.0%; and, after resuming chelation (between Day 7 and 14), -10.6 &#177; 13.9%, -8.9 &#177; 8.0% and -8.5 &#177; 24.3%, respectively. Significant differences in R2 and RR2 were observed between Day 0 and 7, and between Day 7 and 14, with the greatest proportional changes in RR2. No significant differences in R2* were found. Conclusion: These initial results demonstrate that significant differences in RR2 are detectable after a single week of changes in iron-chelating therapy, likely as a result of superior sensitivity to soluble ferritin iron, which is in close equilibrium with the chelatable cytosolic iron pool. RR2 measurement may provide a new means of monitoring the short-term effectiveness of iron-chelating agents in patients with myocardial iron overload. Copyright &#169; 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. New York University School of Medicine
  2. Massachusetts General Hospital
  3. Columbia University in the City of New York
  4. The University of Hong Kong
  5. Tsinghua University
  6. Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons