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Article: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of primary rectal cancer: Quantitative correlation with positron emission tomography/computed tomography
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TitleDynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of primary rectal cancer: Quantitative correlation with positron emission tomography/computed tomography
 
AuthorsGu, J2
Khong, PL2
Wang, S2
Chan, Q1
Wu, EX2
Law, W2
Liu, RK2
Zhang, J2
 
KeywordsDCE-MRI
PET/CT
rectal adenocarcinoma
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1053-1807/
 
CitationJournal Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2011, v. 33 n. 2, p. 340-347 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.22405
 
AbstractPurpose To assess the correlations between parameters measured on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in rectal cancer. Materials and Methods To assess the correlations between parameters measured on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and FDG-PET in rectal cancer. Results Significant correlations were only demonstrated between k ep and SUVmax (r = 0.587, P = 0.001), and k ep and SUVmean (r = 0.562, P = 0.002). No significant differences were found in imaging parameters between well, moderately and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma groups. However, there was a trend that higher imaging values were found in poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas. Conclusion Positive correlations were found between k ep and SUV values in primary rectal adenocarcinomas suggesting an association between angiogenesis and metabolic activity and further reflecting that angiogenic activity in washout phase is better associated with tumor metabolism than the uptake phase. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
 
ISSN1053-1807
2013 Impact Factor: 2.788
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.22405
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000286953300009
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorGu, J
 
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PL
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, S
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, EX
 
dc.contributor.authorLaw, W
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, RK
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, J
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:45:31Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:45:31Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractPurpose To assess the correlations between parameters measured on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in rectal cancer. Materials and Methods To assess the correlations between parameters measured on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and FDG-PET in rectal cancer. Results Significant correlations were only demonstrated between k ep and SUVmax (r = 0.587, P = 0.001), and k ep and SUVmean (r = 0.562, P = 0.002). No significant differences were found in imaging parameters between well, moderately and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma groups. However, there was a trend that higher imaging values were found in poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas. Conclusion Positive correlations were found between k ep and SUV values in primary rectal adenocarcinomas suggesting an association between angiogenesis and metabolic activity and further reflecting that angiogenic activity in washout phase is better associated with tumor metabolism than the uptake phase. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2011, v. 33 n. 2, p. 340-347 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.22405
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.22405
 
dc.identifier.epage347
 
dc.identifier.hkuros192031
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000286953300009
 
dc.identifier.issn1053-1807
2013 Impact Factor: 2.788
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid21274975
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79551550812
 
dc.identifier.spage340
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139124
 
dc.identifier.volume33
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/1053-1807/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
 
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinoma - diagnosis
 
dc.subject.meshHeterocyclic Compounds - diagnostic use
 
dc.subject.meshImage Enhancement - methods
 
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
 
dc.subject.meshOrganometallic Compounds - diagnostic use
 
dc.subjectDCE-MRI
 
dc.subjectPET/CT
 
dc.subjectrectal adenocarcinoma
 
dc.titleDynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of primary rectal cancer: Quantitative correlation with positron emission tomography/computed tomography
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Khong, PL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wang, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, Q</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wu, EX</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Law, W</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Liu, RK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhang, J</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Purpose To assess the correlations between parameters measured on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in rectal cancer. Materials and Methods To assess the correlations between parameters measured on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and FDG-PET in rectal cancer. Results Significant correlations were only demonstrated between k ep and SUVmax (r = 0.587, P = 0.001), and k ep and SUVmean (r = 0.562, P = 0.002). No significant differences were found in imaging parameters between well, moderately and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma groups. However, there was a trend that higher imaging values were found in poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas. Conclusion Positive correlations were found between k ep and SUV values in primary rectal adenocarcinomas suggesting an association between angiogenesis and metabolic activity and further reflecting that angiogenic activity in washout phase is better associated with tumor metabolism than the uptake phase. Copyright &#169; 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Philips Electronics Hong Kong Limited
  2. The University of Hong Kong