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Article: Evaluation of radiation-induced changes to parotid glands following conventional radiotherapy in patients with nasopharygneal carcinoma

TitleEvaluation of radiation-induced changes to parotid glands following conventional radiotherapy in patients with nasopharygneal carcinoma
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBritish Institute of Radiology - BJR. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjr.birjournals.org
Citation
British Journal Of Radiology, 2011, v. 84 n. 1005, p. 843-849 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Xerostomia is a common post-radiotherapy (post-RT) complication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. This study evaluated the relation of post-RT parotid gland changes with the dose received. Methods: Data from 18 NPC patients treated by radiotherapy between 1997 and 2001 were collected. Parotid gland volumes were measured and compared between their pre-RT and post-RT CT images; both sets of CT were conducted with the same scanning protocol. Doppler ultrasound was used to assess the haemodynamic condition of the glands after radiotherapy. Doppler ultrasound results were compared against 18 agematched normal participants. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the patients'comments of xerostomia condition. Radiotherapy treatment plans of the participants were retrieved from the Eclipse treatment planning system from which the radiation doses delivered to the parotid glands were estimated. The correlations of parotid gland doses and the post-RT changes were evaluated. Results: The post-RT parotid glands were significantly smaller (p<0.001) than the pre-RT ones. They also demonstrated lower vascular velocity, resistive and pulsatility indices (p<0.05) than normal participants. The degree of volume shrinkage and subjective severity of xerostomia demonstrated dose dependence, but such dependence was not definite in the haemodynamic changes. Conclusion: It was possible to predict the gland volume change and subjective severity of xerostomia based on the dose to the parotid glands for NPC patients. However, such prediction was not effective for the vascular changes. The damage to the gland was long lasting and had significant effects on the patients' quality of life. © 2011 The British Institute of Radiology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139116
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.84
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.834
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, VWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYing, MTCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, DLWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:45:10Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:45:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Radiology, 2011, v. 84 n. 1005, p. 843-849en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139116-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Xerostomia is a common post-radiotherapy (post-RT) complication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. This study evaluated the relation of post-RT parotid gland changes with the dose received. Methods: Data from 18 NPC patients treated by radiotherapy between 1997 and 2001 were collected. Parotid gland volumes were measured and compared between their pre-RT and post-RT CT images; both sets of CT were conducted with the same scanning protocol. Doppler ultrasound was used to assess the haemodynamic condition of the glands after radiotherapy. Doppler ultrasound results were compared against 18 agematched normal participants. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the patients'comments of xerostomia condition. Radiotherapy treatment plans of the participants were retrieved from the Eclipse treatment planning system from which the radiation doses delivered to the parotid glands were estimated. The correlations of parotid gland doses and the post-RT changes were evaluated. Results: The post-RT parotid glands were significantly smaller (p<0.001) than the pre-RT ones. They also demonstrated lower vascular velocity, resistive and pulsatility indices (p<0.05) than normal participants. The degree of volume shrinkage and subjective severity of xerostomia demonstrated dose dependence, but such dependence was not definite in the haemodynamic changes. Conclusion: It was possible to predict the gland volume change and subjective severity of xerostomia based on the dose to the parotid glands for NPC patients. However, such prediction was not effective for the vascular changes. The damage to the gland was long lasting and had significant effects on the patients' quality of life. © 2011 The British Institute of Radiology.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBritish Institute of Radiology - BJR. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjr.birjournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Radiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiation-
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms - physiopathology - radiography - radiotherapy-
dc.subject.meshParotid Gland - pathology - physiopathology - radiation effects - radiography-
dc.subject.meshVascular Resistance-
dc.subject.meshXerostomia - etiology - pathology - radiography-
dc.titleEvaluation of radiation-induced changes to parotid glands following conventional radiotherapy in patients with nasopharygneal carcinomaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwong, DLW:dlwkwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, DLW=rp00414en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1259/bjr/55873561en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21224300-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052091782en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros194764en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052091782&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume84en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1005en_HK
dc.identifier.spage843en_HK
dc.identifier.epage849en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293943400018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, VWC=7006045803en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYing, MTC=36847535200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, DLW=15744231600en_HK

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