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Article: Geographical distribution of red and green Noctiluca scintillans

TitleGeographical distribution of red and green Noctiluca scintillans
Authors
Keywordsdinoflagellate
distribution map
global distribution
green Noctiluca
Noctiluca
Issue Date2011
PublisherZhongguo Kexueyuan, Haiyang Yanjiusuo. The Journal's web site is located at http://zghyhzxb.periodicals.net.cn/
Citation
Chinese Journal Of Oceanology And Limnology, 2011, v. 29 n. 4, p. 807-831 How to Cite?
AbstractThe dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans is one of the most important and abundant red tide organisms and it is distributed world-wide. It occurs in two forms. Red Noctiluca is heterotrophic and fills the role of one of the microzooplankton grazers in the foodweb. In contrast, green Noctiluca contains a photosynthetic symbiont Pedinomonas noctilucae (a prasinophyte), but it also feeds on other plankton when the food supply is abundant. In this review, we document the global distribution of these two forms and include the first maps of their global distribution. Red Noctiluca occurs widely in the temperate to sub-tropical coastal regions of the world. It occurs over a wide temperature range of about 10°C to 25°C and at higher salinities (generally not in estuaries). It is particularly abundant in high productivity areas such as upwelling or eutrophic areas where diatoms dominate since they are its preferred food source. Green Noctiluca is much more restricted to a temperature range of 25°C-30°C and mainly occurs in tropical waters of Southeast Asia, Bay of Bengal (east coast of India), in the eastern, western and northern Arabian Sea, the Red Sea, and recently it has become very abundant in the Gulf of Oman. Red and green Noctiluca do overlap in their distribution in the eastern, northern and western Arabian Sea with a seasonal shift from green Noctiluca in the cooler winter convective mixing, higher productivity season, to red Noctiluca in the more oligotrophic warmer summer season. © 2011 Chinese Society for Oceanology and Limnology, Science Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139044
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.547
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.271
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University Grants Council of Hong Kong
JSPS
NSFOCE-1015980
OCE-0850421
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Studies
CAS/SAFEAKZCXZ-YW-T001
NSF/NIEHS Centers for Oceans and Human HealthNIEHS P50 ES012742
NSF OCE-043072
OCE-0911031
SCOR/LOICZ Working Group132
Scientific Committee on Oceanographic Research (SCOR) through grants from the U.S. National Science FoundationOCE-0938349
OCE-0813697
Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) Project
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Funding Information:

This work was funded by the University Grants Council of Hong Kong and its Area of Excellence Program to PJH. KF was supported by a JSPS grant on the ecophysiology of green Noctiluca in the Gulf of Thailand. PMG received funding from NSF (No. OCE-1015980). This is contribution number 4502 from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Studies. KY Acknowledges Support from the CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams (No. KZCXZ-YW-T001). DMA received partial funding through the NSF/NIEHS Centers for Oceans and Human Health (No. NIEHS P50 ES012742, NSF OCE-043072 and OCE-0911031), and through NSF Grant (No. OCE-0850421). This paper is based on work partially supported by SCOR/LOICZ Working Group 132, supported by the Scientific Committee on Oceanographic Research (SCOR) through grants from the U.S. National Science Foundation (No. OCE-0938349 and OCE-0813697) and from the Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) Project and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. We thank A. KANA for assistance with the GIS produced maps and LIU Hao for his assistance with the tables and references.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, PJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFuruya, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorGlibert, PMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYin, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, JHWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, DMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGowen, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlAzri, ARen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, AYTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:44:34Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:44:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChinese Journal Of Oceanology And Limnology, 2011, v. 29 n. 4, p. 807-831en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0254-4059en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/139044-
dc.description.abstractThe dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans is one of the most important and abundant red tide organisms and it is distributed world-wide. It occurs in two forms. Red Noctiluca is heterotrophic and fills the role of one of the microzooplankton grazers in the foodweb. In contrast, green Noctiluca contains a photosynthetic symbiont Pedinomonas noctilucae (a prasinophyte), but it also feeds on other plankton when the food supply is abundant. In this review, we document the global distribution of these two forms and include the first maps of their global distribution. Red Noctiluca occurs widely in the temperate to sub-tropical coastal regions of the world. It occurs over a wide temperature range of about 10°C to 25°C and at higher salinities (generally not in estuaries). It is particularly abundant in high productivity areas such as upwelling or eutrophic areas where diatoms dominate since they are its preferred food source. Green Noctiluca is much more restricted to a temperature range of 25°C-30°C and mainly occurs in tropical waters of Southeast Asia, Bay of Bengal (east coast of India), in the eastern, western and northern Arabian Sea, the Red Sea, and recently it has become very abundant in the Gulf of Oman. Red and green Noctiluca do overlap in their distribution in the eastern, northern and western Arabian Sea with a seasonal shift from green Noctiluca in the cooler winter convective mixing, higher productivity season, to red Noctiluca in the more oligotrophic warmer summer season. © 2011 Chinese Society for Oceanology and Limnology, Science Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherZhongguo Kexueyuan, Haiyang Yanjiusuo. The Journal's web site is located at http://zghyhzxb.periodicals.net.cn/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Journal of Oceanology and Limnologyen_HK
dc.subjectdinoflagellateen_HK
dc.subjectdistribution mapen_HK
dc.subjectglobal distributionen_HK
dc.subjectgreen Noctilucaen_HK
dc.subjectNoctilucaen_HK
dc.titleGeographical distribution of red and green Noctiluca scintillansen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, JHW: hreclhw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, JHW=rp00061en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00343-011-0510-zen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-82055194461en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros192977en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-82055194461&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage807en_HK
dc.identifier.epage831en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292558700010-
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHarrison, PJ=9533159800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFuruya, K=7202032460en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGlibert, PM=7004274516en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, J=36599563600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, HB=36618830800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYin, K=7101985944en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, JHW=36078318900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAnderson, DM=7410018378en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGowen, R=7004531639en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlAzri, AR=24074247200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, AYT=23667369600en_HK

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