File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Reaction of silver diamine fluoride with hydroxyapatite and protein
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleReaction of silver diamine fluoride with hydroxyapatite and protein
 
AuthorsLou, YL2
Botelho, MG2
Darvell, BW1
 
KeywordsFluoride
Hydroxyapatite
Protein
Silver diamine fluoride
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jdent
 
CitationJournal Of Dentistry, 2011, v. 39 n. 9, p. 612-618 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2011.06.008
 
AbstractSilver diammine fluoride (SDF) is used as an anticaries agent; however, its mode of action is uncertain, whether chemical, physical, mechanical or antibacterial. As a preliminary study, the effect of SDF on hydroxyapatite (HAp) and gelatin (as a chemically-representative protein) was examined. Methods: 2.5 mg HAp powder specimens and 0.5 mL 10% gelatin (Riedel-de Haën) (initially as a sol at ∼37 °C), were mixed with 0.5 mL of 38% SDF (J. Morita), 4% NaF (Sigma) or 40% AgNO 3 (Sigma) and tumbled in 1.5 mL polypropylene tubes (Sarstedt) for 48 h at ∼23 °C, in two series: exposed to laboratory lighting, and kept dark at all times. The HAp specimens were separated by centrifugation and decanting, then these and one set of gelatin specimens were dried at 60 °C in situ; a second parallel set of gelatin specimens were dried at ∼23 °C. Each was washed with 1 mL deionized water for 1 min, 3 times. Treated materials were observed, before and after washing, with scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM); energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and electron diffraction (ED). Results: SDF appeared to produce globular particles of CaF 2 on the surface of the HAp, but these disappeared on washing, whilst with AgNO 3 yellow cubic crystals of Ag 3PO 4 formed which were not dissolved on washing, but which darkened, converting gradually to metallic silver, on exposure to light. NaF had no effect on gelatin, whilst with SDF and AgNO 3, particles of silver were produced which were resistant to washing. Conclusions: Both principal components of tooth tissue react with SDF; the solubility of the putative CaF 2 formed weakens the case for it exerting a caries-protective effect. The importance of the persistent silver needs further study. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0300-5712
2013 Impact Factor: 2.840
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.159
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2011.06.008
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000294455700004
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This work was done in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Ph.D. for YaLi Lou at and supported by the Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong. The authors thank HaoBo Pan for the supply of the HAp; Amy S. L. Wong and W. S. Lee for assistance with the SEM and EDX observations; and Frankie Y.F. Chan for help with the TEM observations.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLou, YL
 
dc.contributor.authorBotelho, MG
 
dc.contributor.authorDarvell, BW
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-23T05:41:37Z
 
dc.date.available2011-09-23T05:41:37Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractSilver diammine fluoride (SDF) is used as an anticaries agent; however, its mode of action is uncertain, whether chemical, physical, mechanical or antibacterial. As a preliminary study, the effect of SDF on hydroxyapatite (HAp) and gelatin (as a chemically-representative protein) was examined. Methods: 2.5 mg HAp powder specimens and 0.5 mL 10% gelatin (Riedel-de Haën) (initially as a sol at ∼37 °C), were mixed with 0.5 mL of 38% SDF (J. Morita), 4% NaF (Sigma) or 40% AgNO 3 (Sigma) and tumbled in 1.5 mL polypropylene tubes (Sarstedt) for 48 h at ∼23 °C, in two series: exposed to laboratory lighting, and kept dark at all times. The HAp specimens were separated by centrifugation and decanting, then these and one set of gelatin specimens were dried at 60 °C in situ; a second parallel set of gelatin specimens were dried at ∼23 °C. Each was washed with 1 mL deionized water for 1 min, 3 times. Treated materials were observed, before and after washing, with scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM); energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and electron diffraction (ED). Results: SDF appeared to produce globular particles of CaF 2 on the surface of the HAp, but these disappeared on washing, whilst with AgNO 3 yellow cubic crystals of Ag 3PO 4 formed which were not dissolved on washing, but which darkened, converting gradually to metallic silver, on exposure to light. NaF had no effect on gelatin, whilst with SDF and AgNO 3, particles of silver were produced which were resistant to washing. Conclusions: Both principal components of tooth tissue react with SDF; the solubility of the putative CaF 2 formed weakens the case for it exerting a caries-protective effect. The importance of the persistent silver needs further study. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Dentistry, 2011, v. 39 n. 9, p. 612-618 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2011.06.008
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9531727
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2011.06.008
 
dc.identifier.eissn1879-176X
 
dc.identifier.epage618
 
dc.identifier.hkuros194701
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294455700004
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This work was done in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Ph.D. for YaLi Lou at and supported by the Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong. The authors thank HaoBo Pan for the supply of the HAp; Amy S. L. Wong and W. S. Lee for assistance with the SEM and EDX observations; and Frankie Y.F. Chan for help with the TEM observations.

 
dc.identifier.issn0300-5712
2013 Impact Factor: 2.840
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.159
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.pmid21745530
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80051473020
 
dc.identifier.spage612
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138880
 
dc.identifier.volume39
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jdent
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dentistry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshDurapatite - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshGelatin - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Transmission
 
dc.subject.meshQuaternary Ammonium Compounds - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshSpectrometry, X-Ray Emission
 
dc.subjectFluoride
 
dc.subjectHydroxyapatite
 
dc.subjectProtein
 
dc.subjectSilver diamine fluoride
 
dc.titleReaction of silver diamine fluoride with hydroxyapatite and protein
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Lou, YL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Botelho, MG</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Darvell, BW</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2011-09-23T05:41:37Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2011-09-23T05:41:37Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Journal Of Dentistry, 2011, v. 39 n. 9, p. 612-618</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0300-5712</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/138880</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Silver diammine fluoride (SDF) is used as an anticaries agent; however, its mode of action is uncertain, whether chemical, physical, mechanical or antibacterial. As a preliminary study, the effect of SDF on hydroxyapatite (HAp) and gelatin (as a chemically-representative protein) was examined. Methods: 2.5 mg HAp powder specimens and 0.5 mL 10% gelatin (Riedel-de Ha&#235;n) (initially as a sol at &#8764;37 &#176;C), were mixed with 0.5 mL of 38% SDF (J. Morita), 4% NaF (Sigma) or 40% AgNO 3 (Sigma) and tumbled in 1.5 mL polypropylene tubes (Sarstedt) for 48 h at &#8764;23 &#176;C, in two series: exposed to laboratory lighting, and kept dark at all times. The HAp specimens were separated by centrifugation and decanting, then these and one set of gelatin specimens were dried at 60 &#176;C in situ; a second parallel set of gelatin specimens were dried at &#8764;23 &#176;C. Each was washed with 1 mL deionized water for 1 min, 3 times. Treated materials were observed, before and after washing, with scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM); energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and electron diffraction (ED). Results: SDF appeared to produce globular particles of CaF 2 on the surface of the HAp, but these disappeared on washing, whilst with AgNO 3 yellow cubic crystals of Ag 3PO 4 formed which were not dissolved on washing, but which darkened, converting gradually to metallic silver, on exposure to light. NaF had no effect on gelatin, whilst with SDF and AgNO 3, particles of silver were produced which were resistant to washing. Conclusions: Both principal components of tooth tissue react with SDF; the solubility of the putative CaF 2 formed weakens the case for it exerting a caries-protective effect. The importance of the persistent silver needs further study. &#169; 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Elsevier Ltd. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jdent</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Journal of Dentistry</relation.ispartof>
<subject>Fluoride</subject>
<subject>Hydroxyapatite</subject>
<subject>Protein</subject>
<subject>Silver diamine fluoride</subject>
<subject.mesh>Durapatite - chemistry</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Gelatin - chemistry</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Microscopy, Electron, Transmission</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Quaternary Ammonium Compounds - chemistry</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission</subject.mesh>
<title>Reaction of silver diamine fluoride with hydroxyapatite and protein</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1016/j.jdent.2011.06.008</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>21745530</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-80051473020</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>194701</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80051473020&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>39</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>9</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>612</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>618</identifier.epage>
<identifier.eissn>1879-176X</identifier.eissn>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000294455700004</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United Kingdom</publisher.place>
<identifier.citeulike>9531727</identifier.citeulike>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. University of Kuwait
  2. The University of Hong Kong