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Article: Blurring boundaries: the growing visibility, evolving forms and complex implications of private supplementary tutoring

TitleBlurring boundaries: the growing visibility, evolving forms and complex implications of private supplementary tutoring
Authors
KeywordsShadow education
Tutoring
Private education
Social inequalities
Global change
Issue Date2010
PublisherFaculty of Education, Charles University.
Citation
Orbis Scholae, 2010, v. 4 n. 2, p. 61-72 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent decades have brought intensification of what in some settings has been called the shadow education system of supplementary private tutoring. Pupils in regular fee-free public schools attend supplementary fee-paying classes after school, at week-ends and during vacations. This practice is especially evident during the period leading up to major examinations, but for some pupils occurs at all levels of education systems. The practice blurs conceptual boundaries: it is no longer a question of public or private education, but increasingly a question of public and private education. The practice has long been ingrained in the cultures of East Asia, and is now increasingly evident in West and Central Asia, in Europe, in North America, and in Africa. Moreover, new types of tutoring over the internet are being provided across national boundaries. In this respect, tutoring is blurring geographic boundaries. This paper describes and analyses the phenomenon. It notes that di fferent types of tutoring dominate in different cultures and income groups, and remarks on the forces of technology and globalisation. Shadow education brings complex implications for policy-makers and practitioners. It has positive as well as negative dimensions, and requires sophisticated analysis and greater attention from researchers in both East and West, and North and South.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138566
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.140

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBray, TMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T15:42:35Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T15:42:35Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationOrbis Scholae, 2010, v. 4 n. 2, p. 61-72en_US
dc.identifier.issn1802-4637-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138566-
dc.description.abstractRecent decades have brought intensification of what in some settings has been called the shadow education system of supplementary private tutoring. Pupils in regular fee-free public schools attend supplementary fee-paying classes after school, at week-ends and during vacations. This practice is especially evident during the period leading up to major examinations, but for some pupils occurs at all levels of education systems. The practice blurs conceptual boundaries: it is no longer a question of public or private education, but increasingly a question of public and private education. The practice has long been ingrained in the cultures of East Asia, and is now increasingly evident in West and Central Asia, in Europe, in North America, and in Africa. Moreover, new types of tutoring over the internet are being provided across national boundaries. In this respect, tutoring is blurring geographic boundaries. This paper describes and analyses the phenomenon. It notes that di fferent types of tutoring dominate in different cultures and income groups, and remarks on the forces of technology and globalisation. Shadow education brings complex implications for policy-makers and practitioners. It has positive as well as negative dimensions, and requires sophisticated analysis and greater attention from researchers in both East and West, and North and South.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Education, Charles University.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofOrbis Scholaeen_US
dc.subjectShadow education-
dc.subjectTutoring-
dc.subjectPrivate education-
dc.subjectSocial inequalities-
dc.subjectGlobal change-
dc.titleBlurring boundaries: the growing visibility, evolving forms and complex implications of private supplementary tutoringen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBray, TM: mbray@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBray, TM=rp00888en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros191578en_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage61en_US
dc.identifier.epage72en_US
dc.publisher.placePrague, Czech-

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