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Article: Facing the shadow education system in Hong Kong

TitleFacing the shadow education system in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherInternational Institute for Asian Studies. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iias.nl/the-newsletter
Citation
IIAS Newsletter, 2011, v. 56, p. 20 How to Cite?
AbstractThe pressures faced by Hong Kong families have increased in competitive society. The so-called shadow education system of supplementary tutoring has spread in influence and intensity. For both parents and their children, it is difficult to find the right balance. A recent editorial in Hong Kong’s major English-language newspaper, the South China Morning Post, was entitled ‘The lesson that all parents need to learn’.1 It commenced: — Children need to know there is life outside the classroom. Playing, exploring, making friends and developing new hobbies should be as important as schoolwork. But in our scholastic-obsessed culture, school study takes up a disproportionate share of a young person’s life. The editorial highlighted a study by the University of Hong Kong which indicated that 58 percent of parents paid for private tutorial classes. The newspaper pointed out that such costs were a financial burden. For many children, it added, 'they impose a heavy psychological toll' and that'a byproduct has been a shadow, parasitic tutorial industry that exploits the insecurity of parents and students'. .
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138565
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwo, OWYen_US
dc.contributor.authorBray, TMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T15:42:34Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T15:42:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationIIAS Newsletter, 2011, v. 56, p. 20en_US
dc.identifier.issn0929-8738-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138565-
dc.description.abstractThe pressures faced by Hong Kong families have increased in competitive society. The so-called shadow education system of supplementary tutoring has spread in influence and intensity. For both parents and their children, it is difficult to find the right balance. A recent editorial in Hong Kong’s major English-language newspaper, the South China Morning Post, was entitled ‘The lesson that all parents need to learn’.1 It commenced: — Children need to know there is life outside the classroom. Playing, exploring, making friends and developing new hobbies should be as important as schoolwork. But in our scholastic-obsessed culture, school study takes up a disproportionate share of a young person’s life. The editorial highlighted a study by the University of Hong Kong which indicated that 58 percent of parents paid for private tutorial classes. The newspaper pointed out that such costs were a financial burden. For many children, it added, 'they impose a heavy psychological toll' and that'a byproduct has been a shadow, parasitic tutorial industry that exploits the insecurity of parents and students'. .-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational Institute for Asian Studies. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iias.nl/the-newsletteren_US
dc.relation.ispartofIIAS Newsletteren_US
dc.titleFacing the shadow education system in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKwo, OWY: wykwo@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailBray, TM: mbray@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKwo, OWY=rp00914en_US
dc.identifier.authorityBray, TM=rp00888en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros191577en_US
dc.identifier.volume56en_US
dc.identifier.spage20en_US
dc.identifier.epage20en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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