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Book Chapter: Open source, crowdsourcing, and public engagement

TitleOpen source, crowdsourcing, and public engagement
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherIGI Global
Citation
Open source, crowdsourcing, and public engagement. In Downey, E and Jones, MA (Eds.), Public service, and Web 2.0 technologies: future trends in social media, p. 181-199. Hershey, Pa.: IGI Global, 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractThis chapter is an investigation of open source, crowdsourcing, and public engagement in the public and nonprofit sectors through four cases: (1) Changemakers competitions, (2) Peer to Patent in the U.S., (3) Future Melbourne 2020 in Australia, and (4) Idea Box in Japan. Macintosh’s (2004) case analytical framework is adopted to systematically document the four cases for comparisons. From the literature three components are identified to understand the open source and crowdsourcing models: initiator, mechanism for information selection, and beneficiary. Three components are used to examine how governments or nonprofits adopt the open source model or crowdsourcing model to facilitate public engagement. The conclusion is that different designs of the projects might lead to different scales of public engagement, defined by Savar & Denhardt (2010). Finally, some potential issues and challenges of implementing the open source and crowdsourcing models to facilitate engagement in public affairs are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138449
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T15:02:09Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T15:02:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationOpen source, crowdsourcing, and public engagement. In Downey, E and Jones, MA (Eds.), Public service, and Web 2.0 technologies: future trends in social media, p. 181-199. Hershey, Pa.: IGI Global, 2012en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781466600713-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138449-
dc.description.abstractThis chapter is an investigation of open source, crowdsourcing, and public engagement in the public and nonprofit sectors through four cases: (1) Changemakers competitions, (2) Peer to Patent in the U.S., (3) Future Melbourne 2020 in Australia, and (4) Idea Box in Japan. Macintosh’s (2004) case analytical framework is adopted to systematically document the four cases for comparisons. From the literature three components are identified to understand the open source and crowdsourcing models: initiator, mechanism for information selection, and beneficiary. Three components are used to examine how governments or nonprofits adopt the open source model or crowdsourcing model to facilitate public engagement. The conclusion is that different designs of the projects might lead to different scales of public engagement, defined by Savar & Denhardt (2010). Finally, some potential issues and challenges of implementing the open source and crowdsourcing models to facilitate engagement in public affairs are discussed.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherIGI Globalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPublic service, and Web 2.0 technologies: future trends in social mediaen_US
dc.titleOpen source, crowdsourcing, and public engagementen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailLiu, HK: hkliu9@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, HK=rp00867en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4018/978-1-4666-0071-3.ch012-
dc.identifier.hkuros189282en_US
dc.identifier.spage181-
dc.identifier.epage199-
dc.publisher.placeHershey, Pa.-
dc.customcontrol.immutableyiu 130430-

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