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Conference Paper: Acyl-CoA-binding protein families in the plant kingdom
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TitleAcyl-CoA-binding protein families in the plant kingdom
 
AuthorsMeng, W
Su, Y
Saunders, R
Chye, ML
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherSociety for Experimental Biology.
 
CitationThe 2011 Annual Main Meeting of the Society for Experimental Biolog (SEB), Glasgow, U.K., 1-4 July 2011. In Abstract Book of the SEB Annual Main Meeting, 2011, p. 223 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractAcyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs), ubiquitous in eukaryotes, participate in lipid metabolism by binding acyl-CoA esters at the conserved acyl-CoA-binding (ACB) domain. Phylogenetic analyses on 16 plant genomes comprising green alga, mosses, gymnosperm, monocots and dicots revealed that the ACBP family expanded with the evolution of land plants. The plant ACBP family is clustered into four groups, designated as Class I to Class IV. Class I is identical to the prototype ACBP protein (10-kDa) that has been well-studied in mammals and yeast. Class II and Class IV proteins consist of an ACB domain as well as ankyrin repeats or kelch motifs, respectively. Class III proteins form larger proteins that contain an ACB domain. Classes I and IV seemed to have evolved independently, while Classes II and III are closely related phylogenetically. The ACBP family in the eudicot model plant, Arabidopsis, has six members that have been previously characterized. The ACBP family in the monocot, rice, also consists of six members but their distribution across the four classes differ from Arabidopsis. There are three Class I members in rice, while only one occurs in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, two each of Class II and Class IV have been identified in Arabidopsis while one each exists in rice. However, only one Class III member is present in both Arabidopsis and rice. Results from our investigations suggest that rice ACBPs have non-overlapping functions and the larger and multi-domain forms appear to be related to stress responses.
 
DescriptionPoster Session: P4 - Integration of abiotic and biotic stress responses: from systems biology to field: abstract P4.34
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMeng, W
 
dc.contributor.authorSu, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, R
 
dc.contributor.authorChye, ML
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:44:20Z
 
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:44:20Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractAcyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs), ubiquitous in eukaryotes, participate in lipid metabolism by binding acyl-CoA esters at the conserved acyl-CoA-binding (ACB) domain. Phylogenetic analyses on 16 plant genomes comprising green alga, mosses, gymnosperm, monocots and dicots revealed that the ACBP family expanded with the evolution of land plants. The plant ACBP family is clustered into four groups, designated as Class I to Class IV. Class I is identical to the prototype ACBP protein (10-kDa) that has been well-studied in mammals and yeast. Class II and Class IV proteins consist of an ACB domain as well as ankyrin repeats or kelch motifs, respectively. Class III proteins form larger proteins that contain an ACB domain. Classes I and IV seemed to have evolved independently, while Classes II and III are closely related phylogenetically. The ACBP family in the eudicot model plant, Arabidopsis, has six members that have been previously characterized. The ACBP family in the monocot, rice, also consists of six members but their distribution across the four classes differ from Arabidopsis. There are three Class I members in rice, while only one occurs in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, two each of Class II and Class IV have been identified in Arabidopsis while one each exists in rice. However, only one Class III member is present in both Arabidopsis and rice. Results from our investigations suggest that rice ACBPs have non-overlapping functions and the larger and multi-domain forms appear to be related to stress responses.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.descriptionPoster Session: P4 - Integration of abiotic and biotic stress responses: from systems biology to field: abstract P4.34
 
dc.description.otherThe 2011 Annual Main Meeting of the Society for Experimental Biolog (SEB), Glasgow, U.K., 1-4 July 2011. In Abstract Book of the SEB Annual Main Meeting, 2011, p. 223
 
dc.identifier.citationThe 2011 Annual Main Meeting of the Society for Experimental Biolog (SEB), Glasgow, U.K., 1-4 July 2011. In Abstract Book of the SEB Annual Main Meeting, 2011, p. 223 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage223
 
dc.identifier.hkuros189831
 
dc.identifier.spage223
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138283
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSociety for Experimental Biology.
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofSEB Glasgrow 2011
 
dc.titleAcyl-CoA-binding protein families in the plant kingdom
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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<contributor.author>Su, Y</contributor.author>
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