File Download
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Literary citizenship in the writing of Oceania: The example of Samoan literature

TitleLiterary citizenship in the writing of Oceania: The example of Samoan literature
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherSchool of Canadian Irish Studies, Concordia University.
Citation
2011 CISLE Conference: Literatures in English: New Ethical, Cultural and Transnational Perspectives, Montreal, Canada, 10-13 July 2011 , p. 1-12 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this paper, I am interested in the emergence and articulation of new visions and practices of citizenship as politicized ways of belonging in transnational and globalized contexts, in which the nation or nation state as empowering framework has come to be widely challenged. As I will try to argue, the development such visions and practices calls for an imaginative rethinking of national identity and as such has much to learn from postcolonial situations where the institutions of the Western-style nation state sit uncomfortably on top of (or beside) social formations shaped by long histories of prior occupation and settlement. While such arrangements do not in themselves make for political innovation, they provide imaginative resources for writers whose lives and work chart and explore challenging ways of inhabiting and sharing globalized nation spaces.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138237

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHeim, Oen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:43:30Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:43:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citation2011 CISLE Conference: Literatures in English: New Ethical, Cultural and Transnational Perspectives, Montreal, Canada, 10-13 July 2011 , p. 1-12en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138237-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, I am interested in the emergence and articulation of new visions and practices of citizenship as politicized ways of belonging in transnational and globalized contexts, in which the nation or nation state as empowering framework has come to be widely challenged. As I will try to argue, the development such visions and practices calls for an imaginative rethinking of national identity and as such has much to learn from postcolonial situations where the institutions of the Western-style nation state sit uncomfortably on top of (or beside) social formations shaped by long histories of prior occupation and settlement. While such arrangements do not in themselves make for political innovation, they provide imaginative resources for writers whose lives and work chart and explore challenging ways of inhabiting and sharing globalized nation spaces.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSchool of Canadian Irish Studies, Concordia University.-
dc.relation.ispartofCISLE Conference-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleLiterary citizenship in the writing of Oceania: The example of Samoan literatureen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailHeim, O: oheim@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHeim, O=rp01166en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros190855en_US
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage12-
dc.publisher.placeMontreal, Canada-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats