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Article: Interaction of free radicals, matrix metalloproteinases and caveolin-1 impacts blood-brain barrier permeability.

TitleInteraction of free radicals, matrix metalloproteinases and caveolin-1 impacts blood-brain barrier permeability.
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherFrontiers in Bioscience. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bioscience.org
Citation
Frontiers In Bioscience (Scholar Edition), 2011, v. 3, p. 1216-1231 How to Cite?
AbstractFree radicals play an important role in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Accumulations of toxic free radicals such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) not only increase the susceptibility of brain tissue to ischemic damage but also trigger numerous molecular cascades, leading to increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, brain edema, hemorrhage and inflammation, and brain death. Activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a key step in BBB disruption. MMPs are proteolytic zinc-containing enzymes responsible for degradation of the extracellular matrix around cerebral blood vessels and neurons. Free radicals can activate MMPs and subsequently induce the degradations of tight junctions (TJs), leading to BBB breakdown in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Recent studies revealed that caveolin-1, a membrane integral protein located at caveolae, can prevent the degradation of TJ proteins and protect the BBB integrity by inhibiting RNS production and MMPs activity. The interaction of caveolin-1 and RNS forms a positive feedback loop which provides amplified impacts on BBB dysfunction during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in the interactions of RNS, caveolin-1 and MMPs. Current evidence indicates that the interactions of RNS, caveolin-1 and MMPs are critical signal pathways in BBB disruption and infarction enlargement during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138134
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.035

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDee, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShen, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:41:17Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:41:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers In Bioscience (Scholar Edition), 2011, v. 3, p. 1216-1231en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1945-0524en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138134-
dc.description.abstractFree radicals play an important role in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Accumulations of toxic free radicals such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) not only increase the susceptibility of brain tissue to ischemic damage but also trigger numerous molecular cascades, leading to increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, brain edema, hemorrhage and inflammation, and brain death. Activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a key step in BBB disruption. MMPs are proteolytic zinc-containing enzymes responsible for degradation of the extracellular matrix around cerebral blood vessels and neurons. Free radicals can activate MMPs and subsequently induce the degradations of tight junctions (TJs), leading to BBB breakdown in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Recent studies revealed that caveolin-1, a membrane integral protein located at caveolae, can prevent the degradation of TJ proteins and protect the BBB integrity by inhibiting RNS production and MMPs activity. The interaction of caveolin-1 and RNS forms a positive feedback loop which provides amplified impacts on BBB dysfunction during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in the interactions of RNS, caveolin-1 and MMPs. Current evidence indicates that the interactions of RNS, caveolin-1 and MMPs are critical signal pathways in BBB disruption and infarction enlargement during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers in Bioscience. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.bioscience.org-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in bioscience (Scholar edition)en_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood-Brain Barrier - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshCaveolin 1 - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshFree Radicals - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshMatrix Metalloproteinases - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshReperfusion Injury - metabolism-
dc.titleInteraction of free radicals, matrix metalloproteinases and caveolin-1 impacts blood-brain barrier permeability.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailShen, J: shenjg@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityShen, J=rp00487en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.2741/S224-
dc.identifier.pmid21622267-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053121818en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros190889en_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage1216en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1231en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, Y=37014467100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDee, CM=51160913700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, J=7404929947en_HK

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