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Article: Trends in stroke incidence in Hong Kong differ by stroke subtype
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TitleTrends in stroke incidence in Hong Kong differ by stroke subtype
 
AuthorsChau, PH2
Woo, J4
Goggins, WB3
Tse, YK3
Chan, KC4
Lo, SV1
Ho, SC5
 
KeywordsChinese
Hemorrhagic stroke
Hong Kong
Ischemic stroke
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/CED
 
CitationCerebrovascular Diseases, 2011, v. 31 n. 2, p. 138-146 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000321734
 
AbstractBackground: The population in Hong Kong is mainly Chinese, but their lifestyle is increasingly westernized. It is uncertain whether the trends of stroke in Hong Kong would follow a Chinese or Western pattern. This is the first study to examine the trends of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in Hong Kong between 1999 and 2007 with a view to providing data for planning preventive programs and resources for treatment. Methods: Data from the Clinical Management System database of the Hong Kong Hospital Authority for 1999-2007 were used to examine incidence rates of stroke by subtypes among the Hong Kong population aged 35 and above. Poisson regression models were used to examine the trends in the ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence in different subgroups. Results: During 1999-2007, while the age-adjusted incidence of ischemic stroke has decreased, that of hemorrhagic stroke has remained fairly stable. In the younger age group (35-44 years), the incidence of ischemic stroke remained stable, whereas that of hemorrhagic stroke has increased. Furthermore, the incidence of all stroke among Hong Kong Chinese is much higher than in many other developed countries. Conclusions: There were different trends of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke incidence in Hong Kong. The findings highlight the public health importance of further research into the underlying causes of the increasing trend in hemorrhagic stroke in the younger age group, and the higher overall age-adjusted stroke incidence in Hong Kong compared with other developed countries. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
 
ISSN1015-9770
2012 Impact Factor: 2.814
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.442
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000321734
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000291815300005
Funding AgencyGrant Number
The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust
Health and Health Services Research Fund (HHSRF)06070451
Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR Government
Funding Information:

This study was supported by 'CADENZA: A Jockey Club Initiative for Seniors' funded by The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, and the Health and Health Services Research Fund (HHSRF: 06070451), Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR Government. The authors would like to acknowledge the Strategy and Planning Division of the Hospital Authority for the provision of data for this study.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChau, PH
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, J
 
dc.contributor.authorGoggins, WB
 
dc.contributor.authorTse, YK
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KC
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, SV
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, SC
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:40:53Z
 
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:40:53Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: The population in Hong Kong is mainly Chinese, but their lifestyle is increasingly westernized. It is uncertain whether the trends of stroke in Hong Kong would follow a Chinese or Western pattern. This is the first study to examine the trends of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in Hong Kong between 1999 and 2007 with a view to providing data for planning preventive programs and resources for treatment. Methods: Data from the Clinical Management System database of the Hong Kong Hospital Authority for 1999-2007 were used to examine incidence rates of stroke by subtypes among the Hong Kong population aged 35 and above. Poisson regression models were used to examine the trends in the ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence in different subgroups. Results: During 1999-2007, while the age-adjusted incidence of ischemic stroke has decreased, that of hemorrhagic stroke has remained fairly stable. In the younger age group (35-44 years), the incidence of ischemic stroke remained stable, whereas that of hemorrhagic stroke has increased. Furthermore, the incidence of all stroke among Hong Kong Chinese is much higher than in many other developed countries. Conclusions: There were different trends of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke incidence in Hong Kong. The findings highlight the public health importance of further research into the underlying causes of the increasing trend in hemorrhagic stroke in the younger age group, and the higher overall age-adjusted stroke incidence in Hong Kong compared with other developed countries. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationCerebrovascular Diseases, 2011, v. 31 n. 2, p. 138-146 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000321734
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000321734
 
dc.identifier.eissn1421-9786
 
dc.identifier.epage146
 
dc.identifier.hkuros190125
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291815300005
Funding AgencyGrant Number
The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust
Health and Health Services Research Fund (HHSRF)06070451
Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR Government
Funding Information:

This study was supported by 'CADENZA: A Jockey Club Initiative for Seniors' funded by The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust, and the Health and Health Services Research Fund (HHSRF: 06070451), Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR Government. The authors would like to acknowledge the Strategy and Planning Division of the Hospital Authority for the provision of data for this study.

 
dc.identifier.issn1015-9770
2012 Impact Factor: 2.814
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.442
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid21135549
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649717022
 
dc.identifier.spage138
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138117
 
dc.identifier.volume31
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/CED
 
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland
 
dc.relation.ispartofCerebrovascular Diseases
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCerebrovascular Diseases. Copyright © S Karger AG.
 
dc.subject.meshBrain Ischemia - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshIntracranial Hemorrhages - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshIschemic Attack, Transient - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshStroke - epidemiology
 
dc.subjectChinese
 
dc.subjectHemorrhagic stroke
 
dc.subjectHong Kong
 
dc.subjectIschemic stroke
 
dc.titleTrends in stroke incidence in Hong Kong differ by stroke subtype
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Goggins, WB</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tse, YK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, KC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lo, SV</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ho, SC</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. Hong Kong Hospital Authority
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Division of Biostatistics
  4. Faculty of Medicine
  5. Chinese University of Hong Kong